Halloween Is Cancelled in Connecticut, Then Reinstated after Copious Complaints
October 13, 2015, 12:37 PM
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Diversity cultists want to promote the social practices of foreigners by stomping out the culture of Americans, which the multiculturists find less desirable than, say, that of honor-killing Pakistan, for example.

Christmas and Easter, being religion based, get the annual disapproval treatment, where schools tell kids and parents that important celebrations will no longer be held, because some foreign kid might feel left out. Often, a single complaint from an immigrant can end a special event kids really love, like how the traditional visit from Santa to a Minnesota Headstart class was cancelled because a Somali became miffed at the infidel custom.

Religious holidays get rejiggered into meaningless seasonal whatnots, like Christmas becoming the Winter observance.

MexicanTacoCostumeOn the other hand, Halloween — once All Hallow’s Eve — has morphed into something totally secular, and is now an occasion to play dress up and eat lots of candy. The objections to Halloween are therefore more suspect.

Perhaps the costumes are getting too creative and culturally edgy. Liberal enforcers might get offended about cultural appropriation they deem inappropriate.

Anyway, today has a small victory for silly outfits, culture and freedom:

Outcry In Milford Brings Back Canceled Halloween Parades, Hartford Courant, October 12, 2015

MILFORD – The school system in Milford has reversed its cancellation of the annual Halloween costume parades at the city’s elementary schools following an outcry from parents.

Superintendent Elizabeth Feser wrote in a letter Monday that the controversy over the parade was becoming a distraction.

She said the goal in canceling the parades in the schools had been to create a substitute Halloween celebration for families that would be inclusive of all children, including those who might not take part in the parade for religious or cultural reasons.

An online petition had been started asking the school district to restore the parades.

Victoria Johannsen, mother of a third-grader at Live Oaks School, told the Connecticut Post the decision to cancel wasn’t fair to students who cherish the parade.