Illegal Workers Overlooked in Mine Collapse
August 17, 2007, 02:31 AM
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The ongoing Utah mine disaster gets the warm and fuzzy treatment from la Times. There`s no mention that three of the trapped miners are likely illegal aliens from the nation of scabs (Mexico).

MOCORITO, Mexico - Labor recruiters from Utah first came to the rural hamlets that surround this town in the western state of Sinaloa two generations ago, with promises of dollars to be made digging deep into the earth.

Onesimo Payan Carrillo, a retired miner, remembers them as "really tall, really blond men" who persuaded him and many others to leave their cornfields for U.S. coal mines.

The bond between this corner of Sinaloa and Utah has remained alive ever since, with sons and grandsons following in the footsteps of those first miners, including two young men who were trapped following the Aug. 6 collapse of the Crandall Canyon Mine near Huntington, Utah. [Relatives in Mexico can only pray for miners Los Anegeles Times 8/16/07]

Of course, anyone who knows the least bit about American labor history understands that US miners fought and died for those jobs, and the reason that mining isn`t as dangerous as previously is because of the long struggle of miners and unions.

But today, unions are too corrupt to protect the American worker and favor opening the border to endless foreigners whom the unions hope to organize. In an earlier time, labor leaders like Samuel Gompers understood that flooding the country with excess workers was detrimental to goals of improved wages and working conditions.

Last year I wrote about the mining industry`s assault on citizen workers in American Miners Now Targeted. The mine owners falsely claimed that mining was another "job Americans don`t want to do."

Current propaganda efforts seem to be effective in Utah. I saw a man-on-the-street interview on cable TV and the guy piped up without being asked that those "immigrant" workers were here to "feed their families," a popular line from the open-borders crowd.