VDARE.com: 09/14/04 - Blog Articles
September 14, 2004, 05:00 AM
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Blogging Officially Starts At VDARE.COM  [James Fulford]

In Words, as Fashions, the same Rule will hold;
Alike Fantastick, if too New, or Old;
Be not the first by whom the New are try'd,
Nor yet the last to lay the Old aside

An Essay on Criticism Alexander Pope

Blogging is somewhat new here, and we will act like we're not interested in Technorati ratings, Trackbacks, and suchlike technical things.

We will however have permalinks, archives, and links to other blogs.

When VDARE.COM started, and for quite some time afterward, we used the motto:

Updated when we get annoyed, which is frequently

It has more credibility than "All The News That's Fit To Print."

We want to print news that's unfit to print. Not only not printed by the Democratic controlled mainstream press, but by the Republican controlled National Review right. (Vdare.com is non-partisan, not bipartisan.)

We also want more speed. Breaking news demands quick response.

We can also throw in tips on how to use this "internet" thing, archive updates, links to internet resources, and perhaps the occasional recipe.

Clintonize Immigration  [James Fulford]

Here's Ramesh Ponnuru on the Republican Platform Committee's wrangle over the immigration plank.

The committee suggested making the system "more legal, safe, orderly, and humane."

Of course, it's not the system that needs to be "more legal," it's the immigration that needs to be more legal.

My alternative suggestion, based on an idea of Bill Clinton's: "Immigration should be safe, legal and rare."

The Wrong Victim  [James Fulford]

African-American activists in Queens, New York protested the decision to name a Police Athletic League center after slain police officer Edward Byrne. He was white.

The Reverend Charles Norris, a man so all around lovable that he was actually denounced for insensitivity by Al Sharpton, said that the center should honor a dead African-American cop.

In a statement weirdly reminiscent of the late Joseph McCarthy of blessed memory, the Reverend said that he

"[H] ad a list of seven names of fallen black officers but would not divulge them till the PAL agreed to remove Byrne's name from the center."

Of course, it's been mentioned that Byrne, who was 22 when he was gunned down by David McClary,  on the orders of crack lords Pappy Mason, and Lorenzo "Fat Cat" Nichols, died while trying to protect the African-American community from the men who were moving 25,000 vials of crack a week through the Baisley Park Houses.

What hasn't been mentioned is the more obvious fact that Byrne was killed by a member of the African-American community, during a year when there were 2,244 murders in New York State.

Another Hate Crime Fraud  [James Fulford]

This time it was for the insurance. (This insurance problem is sometimes a factor in phony attacks on abortion clinics.)

Judges in Mexico  [James Fulford]

From time to time, you will read in VDARE.COM that that a Mexican judge has ruled in favor of his countrymen getting away with murder, or the Mexican Supreme Court has said that Americans in Mexico have no rights.

When you read that, think back to this note from Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution:

Facts about the Mexican judiciary

1. In Mexico the federal judiciary employs 29,800 employees; in the much larger and richer United States the same number is 34,000.

2. Mexico employs about 900 federal judges; in the United States it is 1700.

3. The Mexican Supreme Court employs 3400 individuals; in the United States the corresponding number is 430.

4. The Mexican federal judiciary employs more chauffeurs than judges.

I can think of at least two explanations. First, Mexico, which has lower wage rates, chooses a higher labor-to-capital ratio. Second, the Mexican system is full of corrupt perks.

My blog source writes:

"En México, el tercer poder es totalmente disfuncional en todos sus niveles y funciones." [In Mexico the third branch of government is totally dysfunctional in all of its levels and functions.]

Number of judges do not the rule of law make.