A Southern Reader Writes On Robert E. Lee
June 29, 2015, 08:48 PM
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Re: A White Alabama Reader Says That While We’re Arguing Over The Battle Flag, Obamatrade Will Reduce Blacks AND Whites To Third World Status

From: John E. Rebb [Email him]

It's a sad state of affairs when you can't escape P.C., even at VDARE.com. A case in point was the "Alabama Engineer" claim that Robert E. Lee was a "traitor."

The truth is that Lee was an American patriot who had no love, in his words, for a "Union that can only be maintained by swords and bayonets." He stood for American liberty safeguarded by decentralized government and States' Rights, the American union envisioned by the Founders.

The Constitution defines treason as waging war against the states of the United States, and this is precisely what Abraham Lincoln did when he unilaterally called for troops to invade the Southern states.

Thus he ignored the Constitution and acted a despot to create a union by bayonet. Seeing this intent, Lee switched his allegiance to another American government (the CSA), which upheld the principles of the Constitution and the Founders.

Southern resistance to federal tyranny failed, but the Confederate flag remains as a symbol of that heroic struggle and opposition to impending federal tyranny today.

James Fulford writes: VDARE.com, which has published such pieces as 150 Years After Fort Sumter: Independence Is There For Those With the Will to Take it. by Virginian Jared Taylor, and Happy 200th Birthday, Robert E. Lee! by Mike Scruggs, is not in the business of maligning either General Lee or the Lost Cause. In fact, there was no reason to believe, in 1860, that it was illegal, immoral, or treasonous for a State to secede.

It was only because the South lost that people think that. ( A Supreme Court case decided during the War said that the South's right "to form a new confederacy, claiming to be acknowledged by the world as a sovereign State" was "now being decided by wager of battle.")

However, we have to allow our letter writers to say what they think, up to a point, not what we think.