Whiner Chorus Tunes Up
December 19, 2006, 11:14 PM
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It looks like family togetherness will be a top talking point in the battle for hearts and minds in the upcoming immigration debate. Anchor-baby children left behind will become the symbol of family disruption caused by immigration law enforcement, as they already have in the Swift meatpacking crackdown.

Watch for deportation-caused family separation to be portrayed as the most heart-breaking problem facing America. church squatter Elvira Arellano Elvira Arellano led the way with her church squat that continues today. Open-borders enthusiasts are not dismayed by her felony conviction for using a fraudulent Social Security number, as a part of her arrest and deportation in a post-9/11 roundup of illegals at O'hare Airport. She argues that her rights as the mother of an anchor-baby child trumps the rights of Americans to control their borders.

Elvira is a common criminal. Yet her supporters adoringly call her the "face of the movement." In that, at least, they are correct.

Incidentally, a recent poll found that 90 percent of Chicago readers were not favorably inclined toward Elvira's antics: Few have sympathy for plight of Arellano.

Another Mexican is doing the family tapdance after being arrested as an illegal [Immigrant featured in article is arrested, Chicago Sun-Times, by Esther J. Cepeda, December 19, 2006].

Martin Barrios, a 35-year-old factory worker who became a public face for the millions of illegal immigrants who, if deported, would have to leave their U.S.-born children behind, was arrested Friday morning.

According to a spokesperson from Centro Sin Fronteras, [snd them mail]a local immigrant-rights group, Barrios was arrested at his Berwyn home about 6:30 a.m. Friday in his pajamas, as his wife and children watched.

Barrios brought the story of his struggle to stay in the United States to the Sun-Times in April. At that time, he had his hopes set on a bill sponsored by U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush (D-Chicago) that would have kept him and 35 other Illinoisans with "mixed immigration status" in the U.S. The bill has not passed the House.

Of course Barrios could keep his family together in Mexico if he wished. He instead chooses to leave them in America, where taxpayers provide free social services for illegal alien families who have US-born meal-ticket kiddies.

Any social worker or psychologist can tell you that it is preferable for a family to be poor and together than better off and apart. But for Mexican squatters, it's all about the money.