TABLET: "Jew Who Called in Bomb Threats Was Anti-Semitic"
March 24, 2017, 05:52 PM
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From the Anti-Defamation League:
Jonathan A. Greenblatt, ADL CEO, issued the following statement:

We are relieved there’s been an arrest in the majority of the bomb threats against JCCs, schools, synagogues and several of our offices across the country. We are deeply grateful to the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security, and the state and local law enforcement officials who made this investigation the highest priority.

While the details of this crime remain unclear, the impact of this individual’s actions is crystal clear: These were acts of anti-Semitism.

From The Tablet:
YES, THE JEW WHO CALLED IN BOMB THREATS WAS ANTI-SEMITIC

Being Jewish doesn’t immunize a person from being anti-Semitic. It just fuses their bigotry with betrayal.

By David Schraub

March 23, 2017 • 5:00 PM

On March 1, I penned a column excoriating Donald Trump and other mainstream conservatives for suggesting attacks on Jewish sites—bomb threats, vandalism, and otherwise—were false flag attacks designed to discredit the right.

Later that week, Juan Thompson—a former journalist for the left-wing outlet The Intercept—became the first man arrested for calling in some of these threats, allegedly in the hopes that he could blame his ex-girlfriend for the crime. Clearly, I lack the gift of timing.

Today, Israeli officials announced the arrest of a 19-year-old with dual Israeli-American citizenship who is alleged to have been behind many of the remaining bomb calls. …

For Jews, by contrast, this is agonizing. First having to endure these threats, we must now also deal with the painful knowledge that many of them were acts of betrayal. …

The man who did this was anti-Semitic.

As you know, I’m a big fan of Orwell’s adaptation of the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis to politics: the basic idea behind 1984′s Newspeak is that if you don’t have a word for a concept, it’s harder to think the thought.

For example, as this chart from Google Trends shows, the English-speaking world obsesses over who might be anti-Semitic. Is Trump anti-Semitic? Was Walt Disney anti-Semitic? Is PewDiePie anti-Semitic? These are pressing issues that modern Americans worry about.

Screenshot 2017-03-24 15.44.00

In contrast, the logically parallel term “anti-Gentilic” just doesn’t come up enough for Google Trends to notice it being used.

Similarly, the term “hate hoax” has never appeared in the New York Times since 1851:

Screenshot 2017-03-24 16.26.36

[Comment at Unz.com]