Reconquista Meets Terminator
April 29, 2005, 10:37 PM
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While Terry Anderson has the Gubernator listed as one "Most Horriblest Clown of the Week" for backing off on his "close the border" comment, historian Clayton Cramer gives him credit for praising the Minutemen, and saying the Los Angeles, CA,, Mexico sign erected by KRCA was not funny.

Check out Cramer's note on the origin of the modern Reconquista movement:

The term Reconquista originally referred to the reconquest of Moorish Spain by Christian Europe; the term is now used by certain Marxist Hispanics to refer to the recovery of the Southwest by the same techniques Americans used to take Texas and then California from Mexico in the nineteenth century.) From my unpublished paper, "Race And Reporting: The Los Angeles Times in Early 1916":

In 1915, before the Columbus raid, the United States government became aware of the Plan of San Diego. Carranzista officers hatched the plan with the backing of German and Austrian diplomats at Monterrey in Nuevo Le??n. It proposed a revolution to retake the Southwestern states, and establish a republic controlled by Mexicans, Japanese, blacks, and Indians. All Anglo males over sixteen were to be killed. Once successful, the new republic would attach itself to Mexico. The Plan then called for assistance to blacks to similarly take the Southern states out of the United States.[18] While seemingly ludicrous today, there were at least 73 border raids along the Texas border in 1915, �many in the name of the Plan of San Diego�[19]— and a Mexican Army lieutenant colonel loyal to Carranza led at least one of these raids.[20] In Texas, not surprisingly, popular awareness of this plan led both to vigilantism and murder of Hispanics with no apparent connection to the Plan by state and local police,[21] pushing even more Hispanics into supporting the Plan.[22] At least 35,000 residents of the lower Rio Grande Valley relocated to avoid the raids and the revenge that had taken on a distinctly racial nature.[23]

More on the plan of San Diego here.