Psst! Diversity Still Not "Our Strength"
November 24, 2010, 09:20 PM
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In his VDARE main page posting about the delights of diversity-mongering Tuesday night (November 23, 2010), Anonymous Attorney concluded:
Racial diversity isn't an "opportunity", it's an inefficient mess, a financial sinkhole, and a ridiculous distraction.

Thomas Jefferson once quipped that "It is error alone which needs the support of government. Truth can stand by itself."

Similarly, it is �diversity� alone that requires a propaganda poster on every wall, a full-time coordinator on every floor, and endless litigation.

Anonymous Attorney's observations provide a natural opportunity to recommend that VDARE's readership peruse Jared Taylor's classic, scorched-earth treatment of diversity-"thought" and diversity-babble, his essay The Myth of Diversity: Seldom have so many pretended to believe something so absurd.

The quote above from Anonymous Attorney reminds me specifically of this passage from about 2/3 of the way through Taylor's masterpiece:

It would be edifying to count the number of public and private organizations that exist in the United States only because of its diverse population, and that are not needed in places like Japan or Norway. The U.S. Civil Rights Commission, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Office of Federal Contract Compliance, the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, and every state and local equivalents of these offices exist only because of racial diversity. Every government office, every university, every large corporation, and every military installation has employees working full-time on affirmative action, discrimination claims, and other "diversity" issues.

Countless outreach programs, reconciliation commissions, blue-ribbon panels, and mayoral commissions fret professionally about race every day. Not one of these would be necessary in a nation of a single race. There must be tens of thousands of Americans consuming hundreds of millions of dollars every year enforcing, adjusting, tuning, regulating, and talking pure nonsense about the racial diversity that is supposed to be our strength.

Indeed, Tom McClintock, a former candidate for controller of the state of California estimated that before the 1996 state ballot initiative was approved to abolish racial preferences, the annual cost just to administer California's affirmative action programs was from $343 million to $677 million. This figure did not include the cost of private preference programs or the cost of state and local anti-discrimination machinery, none of which was affected by the 1996 measure.

If diversity were a strength people would practice it spontaneously. It wouldn't require constant cheer-leading or expensive lawsuits. If diversity were enriching, people would seek it out. It is in private gatherings not governed by some kind of "civil-rights" law that Americans show just how much strength and enrichment they find in diversity. Such gatherings are usually the very opposite of diverse.

The Taylor essay is about 5,500 words long. Reading it is an excellent, memorable use of ~20 minutes.