Mexican Official: Many Illegal Aliens Deported from U.S. are Criminals, Please Don`t Send Them Back
June 28, 2008, 08:12 AM
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Open border promoters are fond of telling us that illegal aliens "aren't criminals". But just recently, the Attorney General of a Mexican border state said that many of them are criminals and he doesn't want them back in Mexico!

The official in question is Rommel Moreno (Rommel is not his surname, it's his given name, the one his parents gave him).

Moreno is the Attorney General of Baja California, the Mexican state which borders our California. Tijuana is in Baja California.

AG Moreno's statements were cited in Tijuana's "Frontera", in a June 19th article entitled "Pide Procurador a EU cese de deportaciones de delincuentes" (Attorney General Asks U.S. to Stop Deporting Criminals).

Here's what the article says:

"U.S. authorities should avoid the massive deportation because [in 2006] more than 56% of the persons deported were convicted of crimes in the United States, asserted the State Attorney General [Rommel Moreno].
The AG quoted statistics on the 2006 deportations from San Diego. According to Rommel Moreno, of those deportees,
"56% of them had been convicted for crimes in the U.S."
By this, Rommel Moreno means convicted of crimes other than illegal entry. Obviously , he thinks the deportation of Mexican criminals back to Mexico didn't end in 2006, or he wouldn't be talking about it.

The Baja California Attorney General said this at an Attorneys General Convention held in Rhode Island, where he said that attorneys general from the U.S. and Canada should help decrease what the article calls the "the massive deportation of ex-convicts to Baja California".

Moreno put it this way:

"This is an issue that affects us very much in Baja California, because some of the deportees are criminals from the California state prison system, and also from [prisons in] the states of Nevada, Washington and Oregon."
AG Moreno said these criminals are deported before completing their sentences due to prison overpopulation in the U.S.

Rommel Moreno also talked about the smuggling of arms from the U.S. to Mexico, where they are used by drug cartels. That's true. But arms go south for the same reason drugs go north - the demand.

Regarding the deportees, as I've pointed out in an article and some blog entries, this is a big problem for Mexican border states, whose region is being used by the federal Mexican government as a human dumping ground. Maybe northern Mexicans could put more pressure on Mexico City?

I'd also like to correct an error from my previous blog entry. I incorrectly referred to San Diego State University as the University of California San Diego. Sorry about that.