An Upstate New York Reader Suggests That, If We Give The Southwest Back To Mexico, We Should Leave It As We Found It
March 16, 2012, 02:16 AM
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[Previous Letter: An Environmentalist Reader Protests]

Re: A Hispanic Reader In Houston Thinks We’re Ignorant

From: Upstate New York Reader (Email him)

I read Mr. Martinez’s hate-filled rant, and while I am sure others had similar reactions, I thought I'd pass my thoughts on. It will take a few years, but how about the Texans, Californians and others he and his ilk complain of remove as much of the wealth that they and their ancestors (I mean the white settlers, pioneers and those who followed) built up and developed, and remove them to a NON-MEXICAN part of the continent. 

Then, before they leave completely, rip out as much of the infrastructure as they can, razing the farms and ranches, factories and health facilities, and leaving the land the same—or as close to the same—as it was when it was "stolen" from the Mexicans and Indians.

Of course, all American administration, justice and economics would also need to be erased also.  They can then have their land back to build into: MEXICO?

See a previous letter from the same reader: An Upstate New York Reader Asks What Mexicans Have Done With The Land We Didn't Steal From Them 

James Fulford writes: In P. J. O’Rourke’s Holidays In Hell, O’Rourke is wandering around the borderlands near El Paso, asking people “Why is Mexico so poor?” The only answer he gets that makes any sense comes from a bartender in El Paso, who tells him

"You know, this old Texas boy and this Mexican were having an argument, and the Texan says to the Mexican, 'How come you-all are always mad at us and blaming America for everything and so on? And the Mexican says, 'You stole half our country. And not only that, Senor, you stole the half with all the paved roads.' "

That's on page 228. On page 238, he's South of the Border, talking to Arturo Ugalde, the Chihuahua state director of economic development, who says

"Mexico," he said, "is rich in raw materials but poor in resources of technology and of ways to use technology." In other words [thinks O’Rourke] somebody stole the half with all the paved roads."