A British Reader Asks Why Advertisers' Biracial Couples Are Always Biracial The Same Way
August 24, 2018, 10:10 PM
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From: A British Reader [Email him]

bankrobberIn the United Kingdom, it is impossible to ask a politician about what matters without them mentioning the wonders of multiculturalism. It is the Alpha and Omega. Even Boris Johnson, the naughty-schoolboy of British politics, has said that the wearing of the veil is perfectly acceptable in a free society. (He also pointed out that it is ridiculous, and makes the wearers look like bank-robbers or pillar-boxes—another benefit of living in a free society: the freedom to ridicule).

But multiculturalism hasn't taken root properly in these isles. 

We are not seeing the full beauty of the phenomenon.

Take, for example, advertising. 

In the UK, our commercial breaks are mercifully less frequent than in the United States—about one ad-break every fifteen minutes. But the Narrative still gets pushed... and pushed... and pushed. And the only assumption that anyone could make from watching these advertisements is that  approximately 75% of the British population is composed of chaps of Afro-Caribbean descent who have white wives. They buy houses together, have adventures in their brand new automobile, and go on numerous holidays with their lovely kids. [Why brands like John Lewis, M&S and Debenhams are embracing a not-so-white Christmas, by Matthew Chapman, CampaignLive.com, November 23, 2017]

Black bloke, white missus... cafe latte kids. The happiest consumers that the world of advertising has ever seen.

But I say, "IT'S NOT ENOUGH!!"

expressnextIf we are to be true disciples of multiculturalism, then a black bloke and a white bird is just plain offensive.

We need to see more... much, much more.

Like... a Chinese married to an Inuit lady—arranging a mortgage; like a man wearing a turban going on a hot-air balloon ride with an Australian Aborigine; like an Irishman with red hair and freckles picking a new dog from the pound with his amputee, gender-neutral partner from the Galapagos Islands.

This is true diversity.

James Fulford writes: I worry that the "amputee, gender-neutral partner" from the Galapagos Islands will actually be an enormous turtle.