The Horrors of Being a Heterosexual Single Woman at a Majority Male Institution
October 04, 2014, 08:31 PM
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Harvard_Women_Crest_T-shirt_-Pink[1]As we all know from reading the newspapers, life in the few remaining majority male institutions, such as the Harvard Business School, is a living hell for young women: the insensitivity, the repulsive frat house culture, the constantly being asked out on dates by future captains of industry … Can anyone blame Harvard Business School female students for not making the Honor Roll when society forces them to spend so much time shopping for the perfect outfits for their dates with upperclassmen who are torn between offers from Goldman and Google?

Here, from an NYT article, is a comment from “mjs” on a heartland version of HBS: the Purdue engineering school. Sounding a little bit like a female equivalent of Frank Sinatra singing “When I Was Seventeen,” mjs reminisces:

Purdue this year still only had 30% of its freshman engineering class entering as females. I was the first female teaching assistant in my engineering major 32 years ago. I had no problem finding a date while attending Purdue for my Masters degree in engineering. Let’s see I had a boyfriend on the football team, whose roommate was the quarterback of the football team (who went pro);
Her boyfriend’s roommate was possibly Jim Everett. My experience with a comparable future NFL quarterback at a different engineering school was that the star QB’s roommate / best friend was the most popular and respected student on campus.
I also dated fellow engineering students, business majors, got set up with older brothers of my classmates. I was best friends with a number one pick in the NFL draft in his position, with another player. The odds are great when not many females are in your major, when you are smart and pick the non-traditional major …
Thankfully, lesbian-feminists, like Harvard Business School assistant dean Frances Frei, who is gay-married to a former female HBS student, are assiduously working to tell female students via both the press and one-on-one how oppressed they are by having all these eligible bachelors around.