Swiss Set February Date for Referendum regarding Immigration
October 13, 2013, 03:58 AM
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The Swiss have made good use of their national referendum process to fight against the unwanted diversity of unfriendly Muslim immigrants. Although Switzerland is required by the borderless EU superstate to accept any Europe resident who plops down in residence, the Swiss have cleverly worked the edges in earlier efforts.

In 2009, for example, the citizens voted to ban minarets, a clear message of unwelcome to hostile Muslims who are using immigration to turn the home of the Enlightenment into totalitarian Eurabia.

In the following year, the Swiss chose to deport foreign criminals. June of 2013 saw the successful referendum tightening the asylum standards to keep out moochers, who have been flocking since the Arab spring. Plus there have been reports of determined terrorists using the large flow of refugees to Europe to slip in, so there is a national security threat as well as worsened crime.

Recent reports put the number of Muslims residing in Switzerland at 400,000, out of a total population of eight million.

The Swiss sign below says “Enough already! Stop mass immigration.”

The new referendum takes on the EU more directly in hopes of renegotiating the immigration part of the agreement.

Interestingly, further restriction initiatives are planned, including one based on respecting the environmental carrying capacity of a country (an argument that was made by the SUSPS group against the Sierra Club in a several-year struggle).

Vote set for bid ‘against mass immigration’, October 10, 2013

Swiss voters will decide early next year on a proposal by the right-wing Swiss People’s Party (SVP) to reintroduce quotas for the number of foreigners allowed to work in Switzerland.

Authorities in Bern on Wednesday set a date of February 9th for a vote on the initiative “against mass immigration” for which the SVP gathered the necessary signatures.

The proposal, opposed by the government and the upper and lower houses of parliament, is contrary to the free movement of workers agreement that Switzerland has signed with the European Union.

But the SVP argues it will be possible to renegotiate the accord, although other parties say this is an illusion and that such a move would put at risk all bilateral agreements with the EU.

In fact, the federal government has invoked a clause that allows it to impose quotas on workers from the EU-8 countries (Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, the Czech Republic and Hungary).

There are also severe restrictions preventing citizens from Bulgaria and Romania from working in Switzerland that remain in force until the end of May 2016.

The SVP agrees that Switzerland needs immigrant workers but it argues that its should be up to the Swiss to decide “who, and for how long, can come into our country”.

The initiative is the first of a series dealing with immigration.

Other votes will be held on a proposal to limit foreigners based on the environmental capacity of the country to accommodate more people, and on the expansion of the freedom of workers accord with the EU to include Croatia.

Also set for February 9th are votes on assuring financing for the maintenance of railway infrastructure and on a proposal, backed by anti-abortion groups, to remove abortions from universal medical insurance coverage.