Australia To Strip Citizenship Of Native Born Terrorists With Immigrant Parents
May 22, 2015, 07:15 AM
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Australia continues to show the way.
Australia plans to strip citizenship from Australian-born children of immigrants who become fighters for the militant group Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) in its crackdown on homegrown jihadis, a minister said on Thursday.

The government wants to change the Citizenship Act to make fighting for ISIS a reason for losing citizenship, Immigration Minister Peter Dutton said.

The government also wants to adopt the British legal model by revoking the citizenship of extremists who are Australian-born children of immigrants or an immigrant, forcing them to take up citizenship in the birth country of their parents, or parent, Dutton said.

It also would apply to dual citizens. "The principle for us, which is very important, is that we don't render people stateless," Dutton told Sydney Radio 2GB.

Australia can currently only revoke citizenship in cases of fraud in the citizenship application or where an Australian citizen joins the armed forces of another country to fight Australia.

[Australia to strip citizenship of Australian-born jihadis with immigrant parents, CBC News, May 21, 2015]

Seems pretty straightforward. If the Islamic State claims to be a "state" and joining it means you will be warring against Australians, it constitutes a pretty definitive renunciation of your allegiance.

Of course, the deeper problems caused by diversity remain.

ISIS militants have had conspicuous success in recruiting in Australia, which has 24 million people. The majority are Christian while two per cent are Muslim.

The London-based International Centre for the Study of Radicalization and Political Violence estimates that between 100 and 250 Australians have joined Sunni militants in Iraq and Syria. The centre estimates only 100 U.S. fighters have arrived from an American population more than 13-times larger.

The legacy of Malcolm Fraser and other anti-Australian politics lives on.