Angry That Obama's %$#@!!*& Administrative Amnesty Is Still Chugging Along? Write And Phone The White House!
February 21, 2017, 01:38 PM
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In a current letter here, VDARE.com friend and colleague Joe Guzzardi expresses his exasperation at President Trump's foot-dragging on ending and reversing DACA (i.e. Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the 2012 administrative amnesty for "young" illegal aliens).  Joe's theme is that the DACA beneficiaries are by no means "exceptional kids," as Trump apparently thinks.

I'm exasperated, too, set off by a Trump quote from an article carried in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:

“DACA is a very, very difficult subject for me,” Trump conceded during an East Room news conference Thursday, promising to address the issue “with heart. … It’s one of the most difficult subjects I have because you have these incredible kids.”

[White House has found ways to end protection for Dreamers while shielding Trump, by Brian Bennett and Michael Memoli, February 17, 2017]

So on Monday, February 20, I sent the president a message via the White House's communications portal.  Limited to text only and nominally 2,500 characters, here's what I dispatched:

President Trump:

You're quoted in the Friday, 1/17, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: “DACA is a very, very difficult subject for me with heart. … because you have these incredible kids.”

1. These "kids," some of whom are in their 30s, are overwhelmingly NOT "incredible." Sure, there are a few valedictorians among them — what would you expect in a group of a MILLION people?

But many among them have criminal records, including even cases of assaulting ICE agents. One can still qualify for DACA with up to three misdemeanor convictions. And often such convictions result from felonies being pled down to misdemeanors, for the sake of unclogging our courts.

In late July 2012, Chris Crane, head of the ICE employees' union said:

"Prosecutorial discretion for Dreamers is solely based on the individual’s claims. Our orders are, if an alien says they went to high school [in the United States], then let them go. If they say they have a GED, then let them go. Officers have been told that there is no burden for the alien to prove anything. Even with the greatly relaxed new policies, the alien is not even required to prove that they meet any of the new criteria. . . . At this point we don’t understand why DHS even has criteria at all, as there is no requirement or burden to prove anything on the part of the alien. ... We believe that significant numbers of people who are not Dreamers are taking advantage of this practice to avoid arrest.”

Those needle-in-a-haystack "valedictorians" can be handled on a case-by-case basis — ACTUAL prosecutorial discretion.

2. Promises to run immigration policy to benefit us native-born Americans were key to your campaign. That means instantly ending DACA and DAPA, dropping the hammer on sanctuary cities, ending "refugee" and "asylee" intake, halting visa issuance in countries that don't immediately accept their own deportees, and passing laws to make E-Verify universally mandatory and to drop legal immigration below 200,000/year.

Welsh on those promises and it'll mean you've ALREADY become just another bait-and-switch politico. And ultimately it will mean that America’s future will be settled in the streets.

But if you honor your commitments, you'll be enormously popular among ordinary citizens who, by large majorities, are sick of immigration and basically want it to end. You will have rescued America from a Third-World future.

America belongs to us citizens and isn't meant to be a flophouse for the rest of the world.

Paul Nachman

Links added here.

I had to get my text down to 2,477 characters (including spaces, as counted using Word) before the online form would accept my message—go figure.

Because Monday was a federal holiday, the White House comments line, 202-456-1111, wasn't available.  But its voicemail greeting indicated that it's back in operation after the hiatus during the presidential transition.  So I'll likely be conveying my exasperation verbally, too, on Tuesday, drawing on what's in the message above.

If you're inclined to do the same (writing and/or phoning), please keep things polite while being blunt, factual, and articulate.