The Unmentionable Category of Criminal Suspects
March 20, 2009, 11:40 AM
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The news coverage of violent crimes and sociopathic conduct (soaring AIDS rates) in the greater Washington, D.C.-area routinely contains the not so mysterious guess-the-race-of-the-perpetrator missing feature. As Nicholas Stix has pointed out, the "Mainstream Media" (MSM) deliberately avoid any mention of the race of a violent suspect in crime coverage.

Three articles in yesterday's WP focus on the run-of-the-mill homicide and fatality—events that seem to dominate local minority areas, reflecting an uninterrupted business-as-usual string of events uncommon in largely white suburban and exurban communities.

"Police Kill Man Who Had Gun At Restaurant in Temple Hills"is one two-column article next to the three column story "2 Mothers, 2 Daughters Dead; Pr. George's Police Seek Link" (as if there is some mystery as to the nature of the perpetrator in these double-homicides) on the front page of yesterday's Metro section.

Below the fold at the bottom of the front page is clueless Courtland Milloy's column on the AIDS crisis in the District of Columbia (rates are now higher than in West Africa) as if the epidemic is the result of an insufficient "public awareness campaign" ("focus groups", "data", and "money") to combat "unprotected" sex.

Not to mention yesterday's prize-winner for obfuscation: ""Scary Drug' Makes Comeback" on the rebound increase in use of PCP among D.C.'s violent suspects. (A more accurate headline would be: "Scary Drug Makes Comeback Among Scary People".)

What did Damon D. Taylor, Charlese J. Hall, and Derek J. Green have in common before shooting his mom in bed (Taylor), stabbing her 7-year-old daughter to death (Hall), and driving his car on a sidewalk at 60-mph and paralyzing a pedestrian after pinning her against another car (Green)? They were high on PCP.

Night after night on the local evening newscasts violent crimes are reported in Baltimore and the District of Columbia as if the race of the suspect was an irrelevant coincidence not worth disclosing.