Elvis Impersonator / Usual Suspect Freed In False Flag Obama-Poisoning Terrorist Frame-Up
April 24, 2013, 04:39 AM
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Back on April 17th, I wrote in response to the arrest of an Elvis impersonator (who is big into dismembered body parts awareness) on charges of sending ricin-laced letters to President Obama and a Republican Senator:
So, either this is good, prompt police work or an example of "Round up the usual suspects!"

Now:
Man Is Freed as U.S. Questions Another Over Poisoned Mail 
By ROBBIE BROWN 
Criminal charges were dropped Tuesday against a Mississippi man accused of mailing poisoned letters to President Obama and two other officials. 
One day after the F.B.I. said it could find no evidence that the man, Paul Kevin Curtis, was behind the plot, a federal judge released him from jail and federal authorities shifted focus to another person of interest in the case. 
Lawyers for Mr. Curtis, 45, a celebrity impersonator, said he had been framed by a longtime personal enemy, XYZ, a martial arts instructor from Tupelo, Miss. F.B.I. agents raided Mr. XYZ’s house but did not immediately bring charges against him. Mr. XYZ, reached by phone, denied involvement but did not elaborate. [I redacted the new suspect's name: I feel sorry for Mr. Curtis, but who knows how many other archenemies he might have than Mr. XYZ?]
At a news conference after his release ... he said he had never even heard of ricin. “I thought they said rice,” he said. “I said I don’t even eat rice.” 
... Mr. Curtis thanked God and his lawyer for his release. A father of four, he has a long history of mental illness, including bipolar disorder, his friends and family have said. Last week, as he faced 15 years in jail, friends stood by him. 
“He’s definitely been framed,” said Carol Scott, a longtime friend who is a nurse in Brisbane, Australia. “All I can tell you about him is he’s a well-respected man. He would not be guilty of anything.”


So, to help poor Mr. Curtis out, he're a link to his Elvis impersonation videos. I like his singing voice.

(Perhaps Amanda Palmer could write him a poem?)