National Data | Chart | WSJ Edit Page Contradicts Self on Immigration, Minimum Wage
April 27, 2006, 05:00 AM
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Table 1:

 

Immigrant Share of Local Workforce (%)

 

1980

2000

% point change

All Cities (a)

9.5

18.0

8.5

New York

23.2

41.8

18.6

Los Angeles

25.3

47.8

22.5

Chicago

11.8

21.2

9.4

Philadelphia

4.9

8.3

3.4

Detroit

6.3

8.6

2.3

Houston

9.4

26.0

16.6

Dallas

5.1

19.7

14.6

Washington DC

9.6

20.6

11.0

Boston

10.3

17.8

7.5

San Francisco

17.0

36.4

19.4

Miami

41.1

61.2

20.1

Atlanta

3.1

12.1

9.0

Pittsburgh

2.6

2.6

0.0

Cleveland

5.8

5.6

-0.2

a. All cities includes 272 Standard Metropolitan Areas in 1980 and 325

Metropolitan Statistical Areas in 2000.

Source: David Card, Is the New Immigration Really So Bad?, Department of Economics, UC Berkeley, January 2005. Table 2.

 

Table 2:

 

Percent Dropouts Among Native Workers, 1980 and 2000

 

1980

2000

% point change

All Cities

23.0

13.0

-10.0

New York

26.4

17.5

-8.9

Los Angeles

19.5

14.4

-5.1

Chicago

23.7

11.8

-11.9

Philadelphia

25.2

13.3

-11.9

Detroit

25.8

14.4

-11.4

Houston

25.1

15.5

-9.6

Dallas

24.3

13.6

-10.7

Washington

16.8

9.9

-6.9

Boston

15.6

7.9

-7.7

San Francisco

14.3

6.9

-7.4

Miami

23.3

18.6

-4.7

Atlanta

24.9

13.6

-11.3

Pittsburgh

21.5

10.4

-11.1

Cleveland

24.0

14.2

-9.8

a. All cities includes 272 Standard Metropolitan Areas in 1980 and 325

Metropolitan Statistical Areas in 2000.

Source: David Card, Is the New Immigration Really So Bad?, Department of Economics, UC Berkeley, January 2005. Table 2.

 

Edwin S. Rubenstein (email him) is President of ESR Research Economic Consultants in Indianapolis.