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Article By Martin C. Rojas on 06/29/2022

Earlier: Townsman of a Stiller Town—In Memoriam Martin Rojas

VDARE.com Editor Peter Brimelow writes: when I learned that Martin was working on this article, I begged him to let VDARE.com publish it, but he very honorably felt obligated by his agreement with Kevin MacDonald (whose tribute to Martin is here) and it was posted on Occidental Observer (where you can leave comments) on September 15, 2021. We reproduce it here by kind permission. Originally attributed to “Christopher Martin,” we have here substituted his real name, as far as I know the only time it has occurred as a byline, because of the freedom granted him by death after it was denied by the country he loved.

Introduction

For years, I’ve wanted to go to southern West Virginia and do original reporting on what’s alternatively called “the white death” and “the opioid crisis.” It is the greatest social malady of our time, and people who read this publication should care about its resolution more than anyone else. After more than a year of false starts, I secured private funding to go there, specifically, to McDowell County, the nation’s poorest and least healthy county, just east of Kentucky and abutting Virginia to the south in what used to be “coal country.” By way of disclaimer, I told everyone the truth: That this project was taken on as a freelance project and I wasn’t sure where it would be published. I did not advertise my more controversial views. For the sake of everyone’s privacy, each person I spoke to is described and quoted anonymously.

Finally, this essay is not the end result of a research project. I leave the task of documenting the sociological and economic origins of this crisis to historians and authors capable of obtaining grants and book deals. What I set out to do here was speak to actual residents of the area. I wanted to know what they had to say about it all and what they had seen over the course of their lives.

Photo of downtown Welch in 2004 when its population was around 2500

My drive into Welch (pop. 2406 in the 2010 census, estimated to be 1904 in 2019), McDowell County’s seat, is a long one, and what’s most striking is that the last two hours of it are nothing but turns on windy country roads surrounded by mountains covered in the lushest forests I’ve ever seen. I’d read a lot about this place, but nobody ever mentioned its natural beauty—or what a hassle it is to get to.

 

 

I arrive late on a Saturday and figure my best starting point is the bar I can walk to from where I’m staying. It’s small and largely unadorned. There’s a separate room full of slot machines, and everyone’s in there except me and

Post By A.W. Morgan on 06/29/2022
A Republican judge has shown that at least some measure of sanity can prevail in New York City. Judge Ralph Porzio of the New York Supreme Court 13th Judicial Court ruled that the city cannot permit noncitizens, including illegal aliens, to vote [Judge says NYC can’t let noncitizens vote in city elections, by Jennifer Peltz, Associated Press, June 27, 2022]. In January, the city council in all its...
Article By Ann Coulter on 06/29/2022
Subscribe to Ann Coulter's Substack UNSAFE. I gather from the recent hysteria that the Supreme Court has just ordered all 72 million American women of childbearing age to get pregnant and carry the baby to term. This is big news, if true. I’m not at all surprised that every female journalist, activist and politician is threatening to burn down the Supreme Court over its decision last Friday in Dobb...
Post By A.W. Morgan on 06/29/2022
So, the Treason Lobby says, here is who is not to blame for the 50 dead illegal aliens whom authorities discovered inside a tractor-trailer on Monday in San Antonio, Texas: The murderous smugglers; The illegals who willingly jumped in for the ride; or President Joe Biden, who invited illegal aliens to invade the country. Instead, the culprits are unenforced U.S. immigration laws, and, of course,...
Post By James Fulford on 06/29/2022
I'm surprised to learn, on Twitter, that internationally famous policy wonk Matt Yglesias has never heard of the infamous Griggs v. Duke Power decision—and a number of others:  In a 2012 Slate article defending affirmative action Yglesias said Conservatives have entrenched into law the idea that policies with a “disproportionate impact” on racial minorities don’t constitute an illegal form of disc...
Post By Paul Kersey on 06/29/2022
Her story must be told. Her name must be known. A black man murdered a white three-year-old girl, Maria Barlow, and tried to blame it on her nine-year-old brother. It appears the black man was dating the white aunt of Barlow and her brother. While the nation rages on about abortion, an abomination just happened in Maryland. A black man murdered a three-year-old white girl and tried to blame it on h...
Post By Paul Kersey on 06/29/2022
What’s life like in an 89 percent non-white city (77 percent black) on the Fourth of July? Reminder: it’s a date increasingly irrelevant to the people occupying a city once deemed the Paris of the West. Here you go…   New weapons scanners to be deployed as Detroit fireworks return to downtown, WXYZ.com, June 27, 2022 DETROIT (WXYZ) — For the first time since 2019 in-person fireworks are returning ...
Article By Michelle Malkin on 06/28/2022
I no longer bubble with rage when a new outbreak of corporate wokeness erupts across our fruited plain. It's just another day in the pathetic life of the Land of the Greedy and the Home of the Enslaved. To wit: this week's parade of U.S. companies ostentatiously trumpeting "health care coverage" for employees who want to travel to Planned Parenthood–beholden states to destroy the lives of their unb...
Article By Pedro de Alvarado on 06/28/2022

With its invasion of Ukraine, Russia disproved New York Times’ pundit Thomas Friedman’s Golden Arches Theory, which posited that no two countries that have McDonald’s franchises had gone to war [What is the Golden Arches Theory of Conflict Prevention?, by Jonathon Haeber, CBS News, January 28, 2008]. But what strikes me most about the war is its ethnic dimension. Whatever the geostrategic, balance-of-power and resource-extraction considerations, beneath all that is the irrepressible identitarianism that ends in war. Ukrainians want to stay Ukrainians, and Russians want to stay Russian. Both want to defend their people, their culture, and language, extraterritorially, if necessary. History has not ended.

From Ukraine’s right-wing organizations such as the Azov Battalion, Right Sector and Svoboda, that advocate an independent Ukrainian state, to Russian nationalists who want to “regather” Russian lands, good, old-fashioned Blut und Boden nationalism are at work:

For Ukrainians, this war is about its very national existence. Historically, independence has eluded Ukraine. Up until the early 20th century, Ukraine was under the control of the Kievan Rus’, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Golden Horde, the Crimean Khanate, Czarist Russia, and Austria-Hungary. Only the collapse of Imperial Russia during the Russian Revolution of 1917 offered Ukrainians an opportunity to enjoy independence.

From 1917 to 1921, Ukraine fought for independence in an attempt to prevent Soviet Bolsheviks from subjugating the Ukrainian People’s Republic [Ukraine: World War I and the struggle for independence, Britannica]. Ukraine lost. The Soviet Union absorbed the Ukrainian People’s Republic to create the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.

I’m sympathetic to Ukrainian nationalism. Many Ukrainians, especially

Post By A.W. Morgan on 06/28/2022
At this writing, the “migrant” death toll in San Antonio has risen to 50. The deaths of the 46 illegal aliens who were found inside a trailer that became an oven must have been excruciating. But aside from the smugglers who brought them into the country on a scorching 102-degree day, others share the blame: President Joe Biden Vice President Kamala Harris Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayo...
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By Martin C. Rojas on 06/29/2022

Earlier: Townsman of a Stiller Town—In Memoriam Martin Rojas

VDARE.com Editor Peter Brimelow writes: when I learned that Martin was working on this article, I begged him to let VDARE.com publish it, but he very honorably felt obligated by his agreement with Kevin MacDonald (whose tribute to Martin is here) and it was posted on Occidental Observer (where you can leave comments) on September 15, 2021. We reproduce it here by kind permission. Originally attributed to “Christopher Martin,” we have here substituted his real name, as far as I know the only time it has occurred as a byline, because of the freedom granted him by death after it was denied by the country he loved.

Introduction

For years, I’ve wanted to go to southern West Virginia and do original reporting on what’s alternatively called “the white death” and “the opioid crisis.” It is the greatest social malady of our time, and people who read this publication should care about its resolution more than anyone else. After more than a year of false starts, I secured private funding to go there, specifically, to McDowell County, the nation’s poorest and least healthy county, just east of Kentucky and abutting Virginia to the south in what used to be “coal country.” By way of disclaimer, I told everyone the truth: That this project was taken on as a freelance project and I wasn’t sure where it would be published. I did not advertise my more controversial views. For the sake of everyone’s privacy, each person I spoke to is described and quoted anonymously.

Finally, this essay is not the end result of a research project. I leave the task of documenting the sociological and economic origins of this crisis to historians and authors capable of obtaining grants and book deals. What I set out to do here was speak to actual residents of the area. I wanted to know what they had to say about it all and what they had seen over the course of their lives.

Photo of downtown Welch in 2004 when its population was around 2500

My drive into Welch (pop. 2406 in the 2010 census, estimated to be 1904 in 2019), McDowell County’s seat, is a long one, and what’s most striking is that the last two hours of it are nothing but turns on windy country roads surrounded by mountains covered in the lushest forests I’ve ever seen. I’d read a lot about this place, but nobody ever mentioned its natural beauty—or what a hassle it is to get to.

 

 

I arrive late on a Saturday and figure my best starting point is the bar I can walk to from where I’m staying. It’s small and largely unadorned. There’s a separate room full of slot machines, and everyone’s in there except me and

By Ann Coulter on 06/29/2022
Subscribe to Ann Coulter's Substack UNSAFE. I gather from the recent hysteria that the Supreme Court has just ordered all 72 million American women of childbearing age to get pregnant and carry the baby to term. This is big news, if true. I’m not at all surprised that every female journalist, activist and politician is threatening to burn down the Supreme Court over its decision last Friday in Dobb...
By Michelle Malkin on 06/28/2022
I no longer bubble with rage when a new outbreak of corporate wokeness erupts across our fruited plain. It's just another day in the pathetic life of the Land of the Greedy and the Home of the Enslaved. To wit: this week's parade of U.S. companies ostentatiously trumpeting "health care coverage" for employees who want to travel to Planned Parenthood–beholden states to destroy the lives of their unb...
By Pedro de Alvarado on 06/28/2022

With its invasion of Ukraine, Russia disproved New York Times’ pundit Thomas Friedman’s Golden Arches Theory, which posited that no two countries that have McDonald’s franchises had gone to war [What is the Golden Arches Theory of Conflict Prevention?, by Jonathon Haeber, CBS News, January 28, 2008]. But what strikes me most about the war is its ethnic dimension. Whatever the geostrategic, balance-of-power and resource-extraction considerations, beneath all that is the irrepressible identitarianism that ends in war. Ukrainians want to stay Ukrainians, and Russians want to stay Russian. Both want to defend their people, their culture, and language, extraterritorially, if necessary. History has not ended.

From Ukraine’s right-wing organizations such as the Azov Battalion, Right Sector and Svoboda, that advocate an independent Ukrainian state, to Russian nationalists who want to “regather” Russian lands, good, old-fashioned Blut und Boden nationalism are at work:

For Ukrainians, this war is about its very national existence. Historically, independence has eluded Ukraine. Up until the early 20th century, Ukraine was under the control of the Kievan Rus’, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Golden Horde, the Crimean Khanate, Czarist Russia, and Austria-Hungary. Only the collapse of Imperial Russia during the Russian Revolution of 1917 offered Ukrainians an opportunity to enjoy independence.

From 1917 to 1921, Ukraine fought for independence in an attempt to prevent Soviet Bolsheviks from subjugating the Ukrainian People’s Republic [Ukraine: World War I and the struggle for independence, Britannica]. Ukraine lost. The Soviet Union absorbed the Ukrainian People’s Republic to create the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.

I’m sympathetic to Ukrainian nationalism. Many Ukrainians, especially

By Allan Wall on 06/27/2022

See, earlier: Navajo Nation Doesn't Want Navajo Murderer Of Navajo Woman And Navajo Child Executed; His Lawyers Are Claiming “Jury Bias

Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has jettisoned Roe v. Wade, maybe it can revisit another decision: McGirt v. Oklahoma and its companion, Sharp v. Murphy. Or maybe Congress might, you know, DO something? McGirt declared that the Sooner State cannot prosecute crimes in almost half its territory because they are committed on Indian reservations subject to tribal or federal jurisdiction. The state’s police and courts are paralyzed; violent felonies are going unpunished. Prison inmates of Indian extraction are trying to get criminal convictions overturned because they were imposed by state courts. Indians are even trying to evade state income taxes. It’s utter madness.

That madness was brought to us two years ago by Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch (always suspect in VDARE.com’s eyes) in alliance with the court’s Leftists: Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan, Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The McGirt-Sharp decision arose from two criminal cases from the 1990s, involving child molester Jimcy McGirt (right, in orange shirt) and murderer Patrick Murphy (right, lower). They argued that their trials in state courts were illegitimate and unconstitutional because Congress did not abolish Oklahoma’s Indian reservations when the territory became a state in 1906. Only tribes and federal courts, remember, have jurisdiction on reservations.

Anyone familiar with Sooner history will tell you that what the court claimed in McGirt is nonsense.

In the 19th century, Oklahoma was indeed Indian territory, where tribes from various parts of the country had been relocated and admittedly placed on reservations. But in 1901, Oklahoma Indians were declared U.S. citizens, several decades before the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924. In 1907, statehood abolished reservations, then divided the land between Indian families and public sales. Indians participated in creating the new state and attended its constitutional conventions. Everyone understood that Oklahoma was to be a society for whites, Indians and black freedmen.

Even Wikipedia refers to the “Former Indian Reservations in Oklahoma.” And while at least one map purportedly shows one reservation, that of the Osage, what it shows is not a reservation. The Osage Reservation became Osage County, although the tribe retained all underground mineral rights.

The former reservations are also called Tribal Statistical or Jurisdiction Areas, within which a tribe has small properties that feature offices, police, courts, cemeteries, assembly halls, pow wow grounds, and for the paying paleface

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