Trump's Foreign Policy Speech Criticizes Immigration, Praises Nation-State
April 28, 2016, 09:54 AM
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Last night,  James Kirkpatrick wrote  that "Trump is offering American workers a nationalist vision on trade and immigration and is defying the neocons by putting forward an unapologetic America First foreign policy."

That was shown in Trump's big foreign policy speech yesterday—here's the speech as prepared, and here's a transcript on the New York Times's website, with ad-libs.

I've extracted a couple of important points, one about immigration, and one about the National Question, with links and emphasis added:

The struggle against radical Islam also takes place in our homeland. There are scores of recent migrants inside our borders charged with terrorism. For every case known to the public, there are dozens and dozens more. We must stop importing extremism through senseless immigration policies. We have no idea where these people are coming from. There’s no documentation. There’s no paperwork. There’s nothing. We have to be smart. We have to be vigilant.

A pause for reassessment will help us to prevent the next San Bernardino or frankly, much worse. All you have to do is look at the World Trade Center and September 11th, one of the great catastrophes, in my opinion, the single greatest military catastrophe in the history of our country…

Later, Trump said:
No country has ever prospered that failed to put its own interests first. Both our friends and our enemies put their countries above ours and we, while being fair to them, must start doing the same. We will no longer surrender this country or its people to the false song of globalism. The nation-state remains the true foundation for happiness and harmony. I am skeptical of international unions that tie us up and bring America down and will never enter.

(APPLAUSE)

And under my administration, we will never enter America into any agreement that reduces our ability to control our own affairs.

This is getting the GOP back to patriotism—I can see the New York Times and Guardian hating it already.