Trump And The King Family: MLK III Met With Him, Alveda Voted For Him, And Coretta Scott King Supported Employer Sanctions
January 16, 2017, 12:24 PM
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Trump met with MLK III, the oldest son of Martin Luther King Jr.  at the Trump Tower.

Various people, black and white, are triggered by this, accusing both Omarosa and MLK III of Tomming, causing Kathy Shaidle to reply:

Also, I see on Drudge that Alveda King, MLK's niece,  voted for Trump.

First of all, Trump is the President Elect. MLK III and Omarosa aren't helping him, he's offering to help them.

Second, Mexicans are a much bigger threat to blacks than police violence. They lose jobs to Mexicans, and Mexicans move into their neighborhoods and take them over, sometimes by force.

While the media is hyping young thugs  who tried to kill  police officer, Trump brought Jamiel Shaw's father on stage.

You remember him? The young black man who was gunned down by a Mexican illegal in a sanctuary city?

A historical reminder. In 1991, the late Coretta Scott King, widow of Martin, wrote to Senator Orrin Hatch asking him to please not tear down the employer sanctions that protected black jobs from illegal labor:

We, the undersigned members of the Black Leadership Forum, write to urge you to postpone introduction of your employer sanctions repeal legislation until we have had an opportunity to report to you what we believe to be the devastating impact the repeal would have on the economic condition of un- and semi-skilled workers–a disproportionate number of whom are African-American and Hispanic; and until we have had the opportunity to propose to you and to our Hispanic brothers and sisters, what we believe could be a number of effective means of eliminating the discrimination occasioned by employer sanctions, without losing the protection sanctions provide for U.S. workers, especially minority workers.
Hatch didn't listen—there was a bipartisan consensus against it, after all. But it would be just one more victory for Trump if he did a little genuine minority outreach, not based on surrendering, but treating blacks like fellow Americans.