Immigration waves
Statue Of Liberty's Emma Lazarus: Send Huddled Masses - But Not East European Jews!
Thumb patrick cleburne
August 05, 2017, 04:21 PM
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H/T pic  pacificalegal.com

This furor over the redoubtable Stephen Miller’s dismissal of the Statue of Liberty’s Emma Lazarus poem is extremely funny. But it is also chilling. Once again  it demonstrates the astonishing ignorance the Left has of the basic arguments of the Right. This was memorably also shown when Romney raised the possibility of self-deportation in 2012:  Roy Beck On “Self-Deportation” And The Dumbfounded Media

The Statue of Liberty and the malign influence of the Lazarus poem have long concerned VDARE.com. In 2001 in Immigration Myths (contd.): The Statue of Immigration, or Liberty Inviting the World James Fulford was stimulated to produce what I still think one of his best remarks:

This whole thing is very strange. Imagine a hypothetical foreign country with immigration problems explaining its policy this way: “We used to have sensible immigration laws, but someone built this damn statue.” You`d think they were mad.
But I discussed the most important fact about Emma Lazarus in Emma Lazarus – Immigration Restrictionist! 
 The Kvetcher blog, endlessly searching for ways to further charm the wider Jewish community, has come up with a new perspective:

"I recently read Esau`s Tears: Modern Anti-Semitism and the Rise of the Jews

I wanted to share something from the book about a woman often referenced by the open borders movement, Emma Lazarus, the Jewish author of The New Colossus.

Lazarus might have had compassion for “the wretched refuse” but she didn`t extend it to the Eastern European Orthodox. Rather, according to Lindemann,

She suggested that another place, not America, should be found for that unappealing “mass of semi-Orientals, Kabbalists, and Hassidim.” (p.377)"

(alas, The Kvetcher has long since been repressed.)

As James Fulford noted

Emma Lazarus was a fourth-generation American, a member of New York`s Sephardic Jewish community (described in Stephen Birmingham`s The Grandees)
If she could summon the steel to object to co-religionists from Eastern Europe, what would she have thought of Muslims? Or African Blacks?