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By Steve Sailer on 2019-04-21 12:28:00 -0400
From the New York Times: Yankees and Flyers Will Stop Playing Kate Smith After Discovering Racist Songs By Victor MatherApril 19, 2019 For the Yankees, Kate Smith’s version of “God Bless America” was a staple of the seventh-inning stretch since 2001. For the Philadelphia Flyers, the connection was even tighter, with Smith serving as a mascot of sorts for the team’s 1970s Stanley Cup winners, and p...
By Steve Sailer on 2019-04-21 12:07:00 -0400
of using his vehicle to run over two boys, ages 11 and 12. One boy was so badly injured, his skull was fractured. Law enforcement said security footage from the area showed Atuno circling the cul-de-sac several times before allegedly hitting the boys. The boys were walking on the sidewalk. The boy in the hospital is blond. Atuno is black. The charges have since been upgraded to Attempted Murder. ...
By Brenda Walker on 2019-04-21 11:54:00 -0400
The hordes of illegal aliens flowing across America’s open border are having an effect. A mayor in the southern Arizona town of Yuma says his community is overwhelmed. So many have come that shelters have been overflowing and the foreigners are “roaming the streets” which must be frightening to residents just trying to go about their lives. Is this how a “nation of laws” protects its citizens? Tucs...
By Steve Sailer on 2019-04-21 11:38:00 -0400
A couple of weeks ago I pointed out a curious aspect of the rave review in the New York Times for the new smash hit play in the tradition of Hamilton as being beloved by deep-pocketed Wall Streeters: The Lehman Trilogy. Even though the first act is about the Jewish immigrant Lehman Brothers arriving in Alabama in the 1840s and starting their eponymous business buying and selling with cotton plantat...
By Steve Sailer on 2019-04-20 22:42:00 -0400
Here’s the umpty-umpth op-ed I’ve read in the New York Times with the same basic theme: I’m a Woman of Color, So Let’s All Talk about Me! From the NYT: I Don’t Need a DNA Test to Tell Me How Black I Am Tests like 23andMe are a fad that distracts us from the reality of race in America. By Erin Aubry KaplanContributing Opinion Writer, April 16, 2019 When my sister called me a few months ago to ...
By Steve Sailer on 2019-04-20 22:26:00 -0400
From the Daily Beast: Give Notre Dame a Modern Roof the Alt-Right Will Hate Medieval Europe was a crossroads of global influence, not a mythical all-white past. The new Notre Dame should reflect that. Erika Harlitz-Kern04.19.19 10:39 PM ET, OPINION … If you ask me, in honor of Notre Dame’s history, the new roof needs to be a brand new design, representative of today and not of the past. Why? Well...
By James Fulford on 2019-04-20 12:34:00 -0400

Hopped

Last year I wrote that I could refute the article Why Is There Is No War on Easter? [by John Ellis, PJ Media, March 29, 2018] with two words: "Spring Bunny." The "Spring Bunny" was unknown in my childhood, which took place in the 1960s. You have to have been born in the 21st century to have attended a "Spring Bunny" event as a child. See my Easter 2010: Who Is This “Spring Bunny”?

Of course, it's just a Christophobic attempt to step on Easter and as such is actually gloated about as this year in the Washington Post:

Emily Johnson, who stood in line at the Fair Oaks Mall in Fairfax, Virginia one day last week with her sisters, waiting to pose for a photo with a large bunny in a patterned suit. For the trio of siblings — in their 30s and 40s — the photo and Thai lunch out afterward is their Easter tradition, and their commitment to it is orthodox and nonnegotiable.

“We went to church [on Easter] growing up and taking pictures with the Easter Bunny, and that eventually turned into family dinners and then ... ” the 43-year-old lab technician said, her voice trailing off as she made circular motions with her hand, like a wave rolling on. Her younger sisters nodded.

One parent passed away. A sister moved to Maryland. Even holiday weekends got crowded with kid baseball practices and grocery shopping. Two of the sisters call themselves Christian but Johnson says she’s not religious whatsoever. Yet the bunny-photo tradition lingers, she says, maybe because the ritual feels lighthearted after the oppression of winter, and it produces an annual image of her together with her sisters.

“Maybe it seems ridiculous for a bunch of women to snuggle up to a bunny in a costume, but it’s the only time of the year we get a nice photo together,” she says. “It’s just a part of our lives. It’s what we do.”

[Easter celebrations changing with growth of nonreligious Americans, by Michelle Boorstein, April 19, 2019]

And, needless to say, it's not the growth of "nonreligous Americans," but non-traditional immigration, that ultimately lies behind this attack on Easter. Observance ebbs and flows, but most "nonreligious Americans" (as Ms. Boorstein implicitly concedes) still respond viscerally to America's Christian heritage. Our John Derbyshire said on Radio Derb this week:

I may be temperamentally irreligious, but I had a thorough Church of England education. In my childhood you couldn't avoid it. I know the hymns, I know the liturgy, and I know the Bible pretty well.

If I told you it all had no emotional content for me, I'd be telling an untruth. You can't grow up steeped in stuff like that without it leaving some emotional residue, positive or negative.

In my case, positive. I have special affection for the old Anglican hymns, many of which are very lovely. Here's one of my favorites for the Easter season: "When I survey the wondrous cross," sung here by the choir of King's College, Cambridge.

 

So "Happy Easter" from all of us at VDARE.com!

Previous Easter Stories

 

By Allan Wall on 2019-04-20 11:53:00 -0400
Is it possible that the Mexican government is doing more now to slow the flow of Central Americans passing through their country?   Reuters says it is: Amid pressure from Washington, Mexico is backpedaling on promises of better treatment for Central American migrants, leaving hundreds stranded in unsanitary camps near its southern border and allegations of irregular detentions.Migrant camps overflo...
By VDARE.com Reader on 2019-04-20 11:40:00 -0400
Re: James Fulford’s article Black Privilege Is Ultimate Cause Of Minnesota Mall Atrocity From: Colin Wright [Via Unz.com] James Fulford says in his recent article: ‘… In 2002, Heather Mac Donald wrote in City Journal about a New Jersey study that said black drivers speed twice as much as white drivers. …’ Somewhat irrelevantly, that reminds me: blacks never use their turn signals. Okay: when I fi...
By John Derbyshire on 2019-04-20 00:11:00 -0400

Mediacheers

Adapted from the latest Radio Derb, available exclusively on VDARE.com 

Three weeks ago I passed some noncommittal remarks about Democratic Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old Mayor of South Bend, Indiana. That was by way of arguing that from the point of view of the Democratic Party, an ideal candidate would be a non-crazy, unthreatening person with just a smidgen of diversity to bring out the SJW voters.

Buttigieg, I argued, fills the bill because he's homosexual—that's the smidgen of diversity—but otherwise comes across as a regular guy. He doesn't want to persecute Christian bakers or boycott fast-food outlets.

Since then, Beto O'Rourke's star has faded as people have noticed his weirdness and hyperbolic vocabulary. For just the reasons I spoke about—non-crazy, unthreatening, smidgen of diversity—Mayor Buttigieg has filled the void, now that we've all figured out how to pronounce his name.

So I've been taking a closer look at Mayor Buttigieg. From what I can gather about his positions on the National Question, there's no way I could vote for him, unless the Republicans were to dump Donald Trump and nominate Jeff Flake. I'm just trying to figure whether Buttigieg would be a plausible Democratic candidate next year.

My inquiries started out in negative territory—I mean, with a disposition to think he's not a serious candidate.

There's that name, for example. No, not the surname: Nobody can help his surname, and I'm guessing Buttigieg had stopped being bothered about jokes directed at his surname by the time he got to First Grade, at the latest.

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By James Fulford on 2019-04-20 12:34:00 -0400

Hopped

Last year I wrote that I could refute the article Why Is There Is No War on Easter? [by John Ellis, PJ Media, March 29, 2018] with two words: "Spring Bunny." The "Spring Bunny" was unknown in my childhood, which took place in the 1960s. You have to have been born in the 21st century to have attended a "Spring Bunny" event as a child. See my Easter 2010: Who Is This “Spring Bunny”?

Of course, it's just a Christophobic attempt to step on Easter and as such is actually gloated about as this year in the Washington Post:

Emily Johnson, who stood in line at the Fair Oaks Mall in Fairfax, Virginia one day last week with her sisters, waiting to pose for a photo with a large bunny in a patterned suit. For the trio of siblings — in their 30s and 40s — the photo and Thai lunch out afterward is their Easter tradition, and their commitment to it is orthodox and nonnegotiable.

“We went to church [on Easter] growing up and taking pictures with the Easter Bunny, and that eventually turned into family dinners and then ... ” the 43-year-old lab technician said, her voice trailing off as she made circular motions with her hand, like a wave rolling on. Her younger sisters nodded.

One parent passed away. A sister moved to Maryland. Even holiday weekends got crowded with kid baseball practices and grocery shopping. Two of the sisters call themselves Christian but Johnson says she’s not religious whatsoever. Yet the bunny-photo tradition lingers, she says, maybe because the ritual feels lighthearted after the oppression of winter, and it produces an annual image of her together with her sisters.

“Maybe it seems ridiculous for a bunch of women to snuggle up to a bunny in a costume, but it’s the only time of the year we get a nice photo together,” she says. “It’s just a part of our lives. It’s what we do.”

[Easter celebrations changing with growth of nonreligious Americans, by Michelle Boorstein, April 19, 2019]

And, needless to say, it's not the growth of "nonreligous Americans," but non-traditional immigration, that ultimately lies behind this attack on Easter. Observance ebbs and flows, but most "nonreligious Americans" (as Ms. Boorstein implicitly concedes) still respond viscerally to America's Christian heritage. Our John Derbyshire said on Radio Derb this week:

I may be temperamentally irreligious, but I had a thorough Church of England education. In my childhood you couldn't avoid it. I know the hymns, I know the liturgy, and I know the Bible pretty well.

If I told you it all had no emotional content for me, I'd be telling an untruth. You can't grow up steeped in stuff like that without it leaving some emotional residue, positive or negative.

In my case, positive. I have special affection for the old Anglican hymns, many of which are very lovely. Here's one of my favorites for the Easter season: "When I survey the wondrous cross," sung here by the choir of King's College, Cambridge.

 

So "Happy Easter" from all of us at VDARE.com!

Previous Easter Stories

 

By John Derbyshire on 2019-04-20 00:11:00 -0400

Mediacheers

Adapted from the latest Radio Derb, available exclusively on VDARE.com 

Three weeks ago I passed some noncommittal remarks about Democratic Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old Mayor of South Bend, Indiana. That was by way of arguing that from the point of view of the Democratic Party, an ideal candidate would be a non-crazy, unthreatening person with just a smidgen of diversity to bring out the SJW voters.

Buttigieg, I argued, fills the bill because he's homosexual—that's the smidgen of diversity—but otherwise comes across as a regular guy. He doesn't want to persecute Christian bakers or boycott fast-food outlets.

Since then, Beto O'Rourke's star has faded as people have noticed his weirdness and hyperbolic vocabulary. For just the reasons I spoke about—non-crazy, unthreatening, smidgen of diversity—Mayor Buttigieg has filled the void, now that we've all figured out how to pronounce his name.

So I've been taking a closer look at Mayor Buttigieg. From what I can gather about his positions on the National Question, there's no way I could vote for him, unless the Republicans were to dump Donald Trump and nominate Jeff Flake. I'm just trying to figure whether Buttigieg would be a plausible Democratic candidate next year.

My inquiries started out in negative territory—I mean, with a disposition to think he's not a serious candidate.

There's that name, for example. No, not the surname: Nobody can help his surname, and I'm guessing Buttigieg had stopped being bothered about jokes directed at his surname by the time he got to First Grade, at the latest.

By James Fulford on 2019-04-18 22:52:00 -0400

Fortyfootfall

Emmanuel Aranda, a black man living in Minnesota, is alleged to have thrown Landen Hoffman, a white five year old, off the third floor of the Mall Of America. The boy is still alive but Aranda has been charged with attempted murder. [Boy, 5, Who Was Thrown off Mall of America Balcony Is Making Steps Toward Recovery, Inside Edition, April 18, 2019] (It’s likely that only a child that young could have survived—an adult who falls forty feet is usually Dead Right There). Significantly, however, this incident not being treated as a hate crime by police or the Main Stream Media. That’s because of Black Privilege—and it means this sort of thing will continue.

Emmanuel Aranda is quoted by prosecutors as admitting his guilt, saying that he originally meant to do it to an adult, because he’s been rejected by women he had approached (i. e. harassed) in the mall. Prosecutors failed to say if the women he was harassing were white. Aranda had previously been removed from the mall and had a long record of trouble with the law. [Complaint: Man went to Mall of America intending to kill, Canadian Press, April 15, 2019]

Aranda is clearly bad, and dangerous person—Steve Sailer’s response (Maybe We Need More Mass Incarceration?) is the only correct one.

But while Aranda may be guilty of this assault, the people responsible are the judge and prosecutor back in his home town of Chicago who failed to put him in jail for his first assault conviction there. In Chicago, however, the justice system is apparently more concerned with not arousing the anger of blacks and “Civil Rights” organizations than with protecting the public. Call it Black Privilege.

All over America, there are “Civil Rights” organizations attacking police for enforcing the law, and attacking victims for calling the police, backed by a Main Stream Media which thinks that any law enforcement action that falls on a black is ipso facto racist.

By Patrick J. Buchanan on 2019-04-18 15:58:00 -0400
"The president has said that he does not want to see this country involved in endless wars... I agree with that," Bernie Sanders told the Fox News audience at Monday's town hall meeting in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Then turning and staring straight into the camera, Bernie added: "Mr. President, tonight you have the opportunity to do something extraordinary: Sign that resolution. Saudi Arabia should...
By Washington Watcher on 2019-04-17 21:13:00 -0400

Darren

See, earlier, by Charles Johnson: A Twitter Road To Redemption? My Open Letter to @Jack and @JoeRogan

Congress addressed tech censorship in two very different hearings last week. One was a totalitarian threat to Americans’ freedoms—and one hinted at how they can be protected.

The Democrat-controlled House Judiciary Committee hosted a hearing on “white nationalism” clearly designed to agitate for more censorship. Democrats and Hate “experts” a.k.a. CultMarx Enforcers both questioned tech representatives on why their companies don’t censor enough “hateful” content. The Enforcers also wanted the government to aid in the crackdown on “white nationalism.” The tech reps insisted they are doing all they can to censor content that e.g. the Anti-Defamation League doesn’t like.

Only one man strongly defended free speech at the hearing: Republican California Rep. Tom McClintock. He noted that tech oligopolists frequently practice censorship and political bias and asked whether stringent hate speech rules would be used solely to suppress controversial opinions.

The other hearing was less depressing: the GOP-controlled Senate Judiciary Committee looked at the problem of tech censorship and what can be done to address it.

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C6ZeO_yXQAArhLO.jpgChairman Ted Cruz (R.-TX) offered three solutions:

Hilariously, Cruz asked Twitter’s representative, Carlos Monje Jr., whether the platform considers itself a neutral political forum and why it censored a pro-life quote from Mother Theresa:

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