LATEST

Article By Jared Taylor on 05/16/2021

[Crossposted from American Renaissance.]

Earlier: MAKING SENSE OF RACE—Or, Refuting Race Deniers Like Angela Saini by Edward Dutton

The first chapter of Edward Dutton's book Making Sense of Race ends with these words: “Clearly, race is a biological reality. It needs to be understood. The most up-to-date research on it needs to be widely known. Its implications need to be explored. That is the purpose of this book.” It would be hard to think of a more worthy goal, and Edward Dutton, who teaches evolutionary psychology at Asbiro University in Poland, achieves it admirably. The pity is that books like this are shoved into obscurity, so the people who need to read it won’t.

For those who do, there are many rewards. For anyone new to the biology of race, Dr. Dutton describes how evolution produced physical race differences. He also includes an excellent introduction to how r-K theory applies to race, a subject

first explored in 1994 by Philippe Rushton and that remains one of the most important modern perspectives on race. This book is an excellent Rushton primer, and even adds important refinements to his work.

Dr. Dutton has no patience for the idea that race is a social construct. He writes that the animal equivalent of race—subspecies—is universally accepted. One common definition of a subspecies is a group within a species that can be distinguished by untrained observers at least 75 percent of the time. By that standard, races are clearly subspecies.

People who deny race point out that there is more genetic variation within members of the same race than between races—but that’s true for dog breeds, and not many people think the difference between a terrier and a pug is all in our minds. As with humans, the DNA that varies most within a breed make little or no genetic difference. The 30 percent of the dog genome—about 15 percent in the case of humans—where we find patterns of difference between subspecies are the parts that produce physical and temperamental differences. In the case of dogs, these are the traits breeders cared about; in the cases of humans, they are the traits that had evolutionary importance.

Sports fans note race differences all the time. The last time a white man won the 100-meter dash in the Olympics was in 1980 (he was a Scot named Allan Wells). Even then, men of West African origin dominated the sprints. Likewise, every winner in the World’s Strongest Man competition, held each year since 1977, has been white.

There are very few black swim champions; their bones are denser so they float lower in the water, which increases drag. The best ping pong players are Asians, probably because the sport requires such quick reactions. Of all the races, Asians have the quickest reaction times and the highest intelligence. Blacks have the slowest and the lowest.

Post By Steve Sailer on 05/16/2021
South Africa averages a somewhat higher number of total murders each year than the U.S., despite the U.S. having 5.5 times as many people. So you might think that South Africans would have a lot of local violence to think about without getting too worked up over local police blotter items in the U.S., but the fascination of winning an American-sized BLM Ghetto Lottery payout is currently obsessing ...
Post By Steve Sailer on 05/16/2021
Earlier: Left-Wing Blue-Check Journalists Support Attack That Put Andy Ngo In Hospital With Brain Bleed From The Intercept, the website Glenn Greenwald co-founded but recently quit: MEET THE RIOT SQUAD: RIGHT-WING REPORTERS WHOSE VIRAL VIDEOS ARE USED TO SMEAR BLM In the year since George Floyd’s murder, conservative news outlets have endlessly hyped distorted stories about violence at Black Li...
Post By Steve Sailer on 05/16/2021
Do people these days really talk like in a Vincent Price horror movie: “I’m mad, mad I tell you! Ma-a-a-a-a-a-ad!” In 1980 I visited the Museum of Art Brut in Lausanne, Switzerland, which was built around Jean Dubuffet’s collection of art from insane asylums and the like. But the artworks weren’t particularly ma-a-a-a-ad, they were more autistic (a word that I don’t believe I had in my vocabulary ...
Post By Steve Sailer on 05/16/2021
Burlingame High School is a public school in the affluent suburban San Mateo school district just south of the San Francisco airport. It’s student body used to be about half white, with the rest Asian and Hispanic. Suddenly, two years ago, virtually all the white students (blue in the graph) vanished, from 712 in 2018 to 11 in 2020, with Two Or More Races growing from 152 in 2018 to 851 in 2020. T...
Post By Steve Sailer on 05/16/2021
From KPTV in Portland: PORTLAND, OR (KPTV) – On Monday groups unveiled a billboard campaign to raise awareness about gun violence in Portland, with a focus on the Black community. Founder of nonprofit The No Hate Zone, Sam Sachs helped organize the effort with several other leaders in the community. Sachs said during the press conference to unveil one of the billboards at Northeast Fremont Street...
Article By Lance Welton on 05/15/2021

Earlier by Lance Welton: Are Women Destroying Academia? Probably

Washington Post journalist Paul Farhi recently put out a very interesting (if embarrassingly fawning) twitter thread on the occasion of Sally Buzbee being named executive editor of the Washington Post a.k.a. his boss:

“Women are now in charge of the newsrooms at the Washington Post, CBS News, ABC News, NPR, MSNBC, Reuters, Financial Times, Guardian and the Economist. The fact that this is not a big deal is kind of a big deal.”

 

bigdealWhat Farhi presumably meant was that this “fact “was a wonderful example of growing Equality and Progress. He was virtue-signaling his approval at the collapse of male influence. However, unintentionally, he drew attention to something that is important for very different reasons: women being in charge is indeed “kind of a big deal” because the technical literature suggests it will mean that the news will be reported less objectively, less fairly, less accurately—and that some politicians may come under less scrutiny.

Post By John Derbyshire on 05/15/2021
Earlier by Ann Coulter: "I Will Not Be Scienced"—Experts Wrong, Covid Could Have Come From Wuhan Lab After All I have been enthusiastically promoting Nicholas Wade's long article on the origins of the COVID virus. Wade compares the two common theories: (a) the "wet market" theory, that the virus jumped from bats, or from bats via some intermediate host, to humans at a live-animal market in Wuhan, C...
Post By James Fulford on 05/15/2021
VDARE.com contributor Linda Thom writes that letters to the editor like the one she wrote below disagreeing politely and factually with a Wall Street Journal immigration enthusiast editorial, do get published if they're well reasoned and well argued, because "Editors look for differing opinions." This appeared in the WSJ today: Baby Bust Is Nothing New; U.S. Is Growing Your editorial “America’s Gr...
Post By John Derbyshire on 05/15/2021
The San Francisco Chronicle wondered last weekend, headline: Why is aggressively racist "Orientalist" opera still a thing? The writer here is Miki Kaneda [Email her] an ethnomusicologist at Boston University,  who describes herself as an Asian American woman. She wonders why, in these enlightened times, opera companies are still allowed to stage operas like Madame Butterfly, Aida, and Carmen, which...
MORE PUBLICATIONS...

ARTICLES

By Jared Taylor on 05/16/2021

[Crossposted from American Renaissance.]

Earlier: MAKING SENSE OF RACE—Or, Refuting Race Deniers Like Angela Saini by Edward Dutton

The first chapter of Edward Dutton's book Making Sense of Race ends with these words: “Clearly, race is a biological reality. It needs to be understood. The most up-to-date research on it needs to be widely known. Its implications need to be explored. That is the purpose of this book.” It would be hard to think of a more worthy goal, and Edward Dutton, who teaches evolutionary psychology at Asbiro University in Poland, achieves it admirably. The pity is that books like this are shoved into obscurity, so the people who need to read it won’t.

For those who do, there are many rewards. For anyone new to the biology of race, Dr. Dutton describes how evolution produced physical race differences. He also includes an excellent introduction to how r-K theory applies to race, a subject

first explored in 1994 by Philippe Rushton and that remains one of the most important modern perspectives on race. This book is an excellent Rushton primer, and even adds important refinements to his work.

Dr. Dutton has no patience for the idea that race is a social construct. He writes that the animal equivalent of race—subspecies—is universally accepted. One common definition of a subspecies is a group within a species that can be distinguished by untrained observers at least 75 percent of the time. By that standard, races are clearly subspecies.

People who deny race point out that there is more genetic variation within members of the same race than between races—but that’s true for dog breeds, and not many people think the difference between a terrier and a pug is all in our minds. As with humans, the DNA that varies most within a breed make little or no genetic difference. The 30 percent of the dog genome—about 15 percent in the case of humans—where we find patterns of difference between subspecies are the parts that produce physical and temperamental differences. In the case of dogs, these are the traits breeders cared about; in the cases of humans, they are the traits that had evolutionary importance.

Sports fans note race differences all the time. The last time a white man won the 100-meter dash in the Olympics was in 1980 (he was a Scot named Allan Wells). Even then, men of West African origin dominated the sprints. Likewise, every winner in the World’s Strongest Man competition, held each year since 1977, has been white.

There are very few black swim champions; their bones are denser so they float lower in the water, which increases drag. The best ping pong players are Asians, probably because the sport requires such quick reactions. Of all the races, Asians have the quickest reaction times and the highest intelligence. Blacks have the slowest and the lowest.

By Lance Welton on 05/15/2021

Earlier by Lance Welton: Are Women Destroying Academia? Probably

Washington Post journalist Paul Farhi recently put out a very interesting (if embarrassingly fawning) twitter thread on the occasion of Sally Buzbee being named executive editor of the Washington Post a.k.a. his boss:

“Women are now in charge of the newsrooms at the Washington Post, CBS News, ABC News, NPR, MSNBC, Reuters, Financial Times, Guardian and the Economist. The fact that this is not a big deal is kind of a big deal.”

 

bigdealWhat Farhi presumably meant was that this “fact “was a wonderful example of growing Equality and Progress. He was virtue-signaling his approval at the collapse of male influence. However, unintentionally, he drew attention to something that is important for very different reasons: women being in charge is indeed “kind of a big deal” because the technical literature suggests it will mean that the news will be reported less objectively, less fairly, less accurately—and that some politicians may come under less scrutiny.

By John Derbyshire on 05/14/2021

[Excerpted from the latest Radio Derb, now available exclusively through VDARE.com]

Crisis in the Middle East! scream the headlines. After all these years—what am I saying? all these decades—editors everywhere must have the phrase "Crisis In The Middle East" set up as a single-key macro. But what they don’t have set up as a macro: “No Escape From Diversity Hell”—the mounting internal problems Israel has because it is an ethnically divided society. Of course, that might mean acknowledging that the U.S. has these problems too. And, unlike Israel, it’s importing more.

But Crisis in the Middle East! Is this week's news; so with a sigh of weary resignation I hit the pause button on my fantasy about a mud-wrestling contest between Marjorie Taylor Greene and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (Marjorie Taylor Greene confronts Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez outside House chamber, CNN, May 13, 2021) and turn my attention to it.

Last week there was some argy-bargy in Jerusalem over Arab families being evicted by Jews. That got Israeli Arabs out demonstrating; that culminated in major riots on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. This is a holy place, especially to Muslims, as their ancient mosques and shrines have mostly survived there while Judaism's ancient temples haven't. Israeli police went into the holiest mosque to control the riot, which of course riled up the Arabs even more.

It hasn't helped that last week saw the end of Ramadan, the Muslim holy month, immediately followed by the three-day festival of Eid al-Fitr. So for Muslims, religious passion was at its highest pitch this week—a sort of Muslim Easter.

Then the Hamas party that rules the Gaza Strip decided to join in the ructions by firing missiles into Israel's towns and cities. This was terror-bombing, not strategic strikes. Israel naturally responded with air strikes on Gaza, strikes which were strategic, not just terroristic.

By Patrick J. Buchanan on 05/13/2021

On taking the oath of office, Jan. 20, Joe Biden may not have realized it, but history had dealt him a pair of aces.

The COVID-19 pandemic had reached its apex, infecting a quarter of a million Americans every day. Yet, due to the discovery and distribution of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, the incidence of infections had crested and was about to turn sharply down.

By May, the infection rate had fallen 80%, as had the death toll.

Thanks to the Operation Warp Speed program driven by President Donald Trump, the country made amazing strides in Biden's first 100 days toward solving the major crises he inherited: the worst pandemic since the Spanish flu of 1918-1919 and the economic crash it had engendered.

But Biden's pace car has hit the wall.

By Edward Dutton on 05/13/2021

Recently, VDARE.com’s Lance Welton cited my work when suggesting that a general decline in intelligence—among whites, quite apart from the immigration of lower IQ races—was one reason for the disgraceful jury verdict in the Derek Chauvin show trial. People often react incredulously when told of this IQ decline: “Haven’t you heard of the Flynn Effect? The Flynn Effect shows that IQ scores are rising and that we are becoming more intelligent!” Those who say things like this—such as Angela Saini in her book Superior: The Return of Race Sciencesimply have no idea what the Flynn Effect actually is. So I will now explain.

Intelligence is the ability to solve cognitive problems. The quicker you can solve a set problem, or the harder it has to be before you’re stumped, the cleverer you are.

The “Flynn Effect” was the term coined by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray in their 1994 book The Bell Curve for the sustained increase in intelligence test scores that took place during most of the 20th century—until the 1990s, as it turned out. They named it after James Flynn (1934-2020), who had done much of the work establishing this phenomenon. It is vital to note that Flynn never argued that increasing test scores were proof that average intelligence itself was rising.

MORE ARTICLES...
LATEST
TODAY'S LETTER
VIDEOS
VDARE RADIO
RADIO DERB