FEATURED

By John Derbyshire on 10/01/2022

DERB'S SEPTEMBER DIARY (11 ITEMS): Incapacitaton Works!; One Strike And You're Dead; Derb Furniture Crisis; ETC.!!

Cindy does Maine    We started off September in fine style with a Labor Day long-weekend trip to Maine, briefly described in the September 9th Radio Derb.

Highlights: A day spent at the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens and then, on Labor Day itself, the Cabbage Island Clambake. In between, kayaking in Linekin Bay and some exploring.

That Labor Day clambake—the last of the season—was my first clambake ever, and proved to be all it was advertised to be. If there are clambakes elsewhere I’m definitely up for them, but I’ll be surprised if they’re as good as Cabbage Island’s.

As regular readers and listeners know, I take a daily New York Post to read over my breakfast oatmeal. It so happened that a few days before we set off for Maine, when we were in the final stages of planning the logistics of the trip, New York Post gossip columnist Cindy Adams posted a report of a trip to Maine that she had just made. Her report was… not uniformly positive.

No litter. No trash. It’s polite. Friendly. Inexpensive. Seafood. Lobsters the size of Radio City. Locals whose behinds overlap the state of Texas all stuffed into shorts. Realtors could establish an entire campsite on the average ass.

In Kennebunkport, Bar Harbor, Portland, Ogunquit, Freeport, Eastport the concept of dressing is only for salad. Forget shopping. Skirts, necklaces, socks, ties, footwear, knife-pressed longpants went out with the first settlers. L.L. Bean jeans, drawers, plaid shirts, crappy sweaters, sweats, sneakers and backpacks are considered black tie.

You have to cut Cindy Adams some slack. She is the quintessential New Yorker, in fact Manhattanite, with an outlook on the rest of the world—including the rest of the U.S.A.—corresponding closely to Saul Steinberg’s famous 1976 New Yorker cover. She closed her column with:

Mainers, maybe ecstatic just to see anyone, are friendly. Anything you want, except for trees, you have to get in your car to get.

I climbed into mine to get back to civilization and New York.

That was a tad too much even for the good-natured citizens of Maine. One of them showed up in the Post’s Letters columns a few days later:

Mainers are fit, fun, relaxed and unpretentious—hence the lack of ties.

Guess I won’t be seeing you in Maine any time soon. But it’s sad that you consider New York civilization, especially of late.

That last sentence would be a direct hit if not for the fact that New York’s style of barbarism is at least mostly native-born, while Maine’s has been imported from Somalia.

[Permalink]


Falls Rome, falls the world    My earliest acquaintance with dyed-in-the-wool Manhattanites was literary. Around age thirteen or fourteen, my teenage passion for science fiction well under way, I read George R. Stewart’s 1949 novel Earth Abides.

For those who don’t know their sci-fi classics, Earth Abides is a post-catastrophe story. A plague has quite suddenly wiped out most of humanity, leaving only scattered survivors here and there. We follow the fortunes of one such: Isherwood Williams, who we get to know as Ish, a graduate student at a West Coast university when the plague struck (George R. Stewart taught English at Berkeley).

Ish takes a cross-country trip seeking other survivors. He finds a couple in New York City: Milt, ”middle-aged and overweight,” and Ann, ”a blonde-haired woman, about forty, well dressed, almost smart-looking.” More or less alone in the empty city, they have helped themselves to an apartment uptown on Riverside Drive where they fill their days playing cribbage and two-handed rummy, drinking martinis, playing records on the phonograph, and reading mystery stories. ”Physically, he guessed, they found each other attractive.” I guess so.

Ish spends an evening with them.

They played cards by candlelight—three-handed bridge … It was a kind of make-believe.

Yet, as the cards were dealt and played, by incidental remarks here and there, Ish put together a great deal of the situation. Milt had been part-owner of a small jewelry store. Ann had been the wife of someone named Harry, and they had been prosperous enough to spend summers on the coast of Maine.

Coast of Maine? Hey…

Now the two of them occupied a fine apartment, vastly better than even Harry had been able to provide. The electricity had failed immediately, because the dynamos which supplied New York had been steam-driven … Being ordinary New Yorkers they had never owned a car, and so neither of them could drive …

Ish figures that Milt and Ann are doomed. The catastrophe had struck early in the year; winter, with no central heating, will probably kill them off.

They were like the highly bred spaniels and pekinese who at the end of their leashes had once walked along the city streets. Milt and Ann, too, were city-dwellers, and when the city died, they would hardly survive without it.

I doubt Cindy Adams is much troubled by thoughts of catastrophe, epidemic or otherwise;

LATEST

Post By A.W. Morgan on 10/01/2022
Earlier by Ann Coulter: It’s An Invasion!… Of Moronic Arguments Texan brothers shot two illegal aliens outside El Paso recently, leaving one dead and one wounded. Twins Mike Thomas Sheppard and Mark Edward Sheppard, 60, are charged with manslaughter. “At 7 p.m. Tuesday, a group of migrants was drinking water out of a reservoir when a vehicle passed the group and then returned,” Daniel Borunda and ...
Post By Steve Sailer on 10/01/2022
Earlier (Jan 2021): Did the US Navy Lose a Light Aircraft Carrier to BLM Attack In 2020? and August 2021: White Sailor Charged In The USS BONHOMME RICHARD Arson During the Mostly Peaceful Protests of 2020, the most catastrophic disaster in the United States was the complete destruction of the U.S.S. Bonhomme Richard, a small aircraft carrier, by fire in San Diego harbor, which cost taxpayers severa...
Post By Paul Kersey on 10/01/2022
Earlier: His Name Is Samuel Sean Collington: Just Another White Male Student At Temple University Murdered By A Black Male A blatant black-on-white murder in Philadelphia… but the murdered white guy family brags about his support for the 2020 Democrat Ticket, so isn’t this nothing more than what the late Lawrence Auster called an Eloi sacrifice to the Morlocks? Man killed in shooting near Drexel i...
Radio derb By John Derbyshire on 09/30/2022
01:45  The Blank Slate triumphant.  (Everything is equal to everything else.) 05:22  Is there a Right to Revolt?  (When in the course of human events…) 13:08  Establishment GOP speaks on crime.  (It’s not a racial issue!) 22:46  Happy new fiscal year!  (Congress does the usual.) 27:35  Hurricane Ian.  (Caused by Deplorables?) 31:27  Pipeline sabotage.  (A real whodunit.) 36:08  Britain sinks.  (Wi...
Article By John Derbyshire on 09/30/2022

The lady representing the ”Spirit of Liberty” above is from Eugene Delacroix’s famous picture of France’s July Revolution of 1830, not the much worse 1789 French Revolution. A similarly attired lady can be seen on the State Seal of Virginia.

[Adapted from the latest Radio Derb, now available exclusively on VDARE.com]

Michael Anton is a former Trump Deputy National Security Advisor and an occasional acquaintance of mine. He it was that wrote the famous ”Flight 93 Election” essay in the Claremont Review of Books before the 2016 election, urging readers to vote for Donald Trump. Given the prominence that article attained right before the election, and the narrowness of the vote margins, it is entirely possible that Michael gave us the Trump Presidency.

Michael just fired off another broadside ”What Does Fidelity to Our Founding Principles Require Today?” [American Greatness, September 26, 2022].

This essay is in the grand tradition of mocking Establishment conservatives like Britain’s Tories and our own GOP for their meekness and ineffectuality in the face of leftist advances.

But Michael also builds up a case for a thoughtful, carefully qualified Right Of Revolution—which is actually   specified in the famous second paragraph of the Declaration Of Independence. He says:

I maintain it as axiomatic that you can’t have Natural Rights without a Right Of Revolution, just as you can’t have the Founding without an actual revolution, and since you can’t have the regime of the Founders without Natural Rights, you can’t have the Founding principles or the Founders’ regime without a Right Of Revolution. Each piece is integral to the machine. Remove one, and the whole thing collapses in self-contradiction.

Read the piece for yourself—please: It’s an important contribution to our national conversation.

The final paragraph left me smiling. Here Michael is speaking about Establishment conservatives:

To be fair, the conservatives can muster strength when they see a real threat to their position. You can be sure that, if you so much as glance in the direction of wondering if the Right of Revolution exists—even in theory—there a conservative will be, armed and ready…to shoot you in the back.

On that theme: if you had been in my kitchen Tuesday

Post By Steve Sailer on 09/30/2022
In high school, my most cultured teacher pointed out that while everybody likes the Romantic notion of an overlooked artist who dies in obscurity being discovered after his death, almost all the cases of that, such as Van Gogh, are people who died young. If Van Gogh had lived his three score and ten years, he would have been world famous for his last couple of decades. Another aspect of this is tha...
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In weekly snapshots of the Yuma Border Sector, head agent Chris Clem discloses what Border Patrol agents face in trying to hold back the tsunami of illegal aliens whom Let’s Go Brandon invited into the country. Apprehension highlights from August 28 through 24: Some 25,000 plus illegals from almost four dozen countries Almost 600 unaccompanied minors 37 convicted felons One of those convicted...
Post By Steve Sailer on 09/30/2022
Remember how I’ve been pointing out for years that the New York Times news section often buries the most interesting facts in the second half of an article? Well, today’s Russian spy story doesn’t even mention the most interesting aspect of this story: Army Doctor and Spouse Plotted to Give Russia Medical Records, U.S. Says Dr. Jamie Lee Henry, an internist at Fort Bragg, and Dr. Anna Gabrielian ...
Post By Steve Sailer on 09/30/2022
Recently, I gave my many reasons for slightly favoring outfielder Aaron Judge over the unique two-way pitcher-slugger Shohei Ohtani for the American League Most Valuable Player award. Judge has since hit his 61st homer to tie Roger Maris for the American League homer record. But last night Ohtani made a case for MVP by carrying a no-hitter into the eighth inning with two outs before giving up a c...
Post By Steve Sailer on 09/30/2022
Earlier: The Fundamental Dilemma Of The Biden Administration: A Woke Military Can’t Do Special Ops Of course, the Woker the U.S. Military gets under Biden, the more its recruits decline in AFQT scores. The difference between old-fashioned Sixties leftism and contemporary Wokeness is the former was driven by smart Jewish guys while the latter is supposed to center black women for their intersection...
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FEATURED

By John Derbyshire on 10/01/2022

DERB'S SEPTEMBER DIARY (11 ITEMS): Incapacitaton Works!; One Strike And You're Dead; Derb Furniture Crisis; ETC.!!

Cindy does Maine    We started off September in fine style with a Labor Day long-weekend trip to Maine, briefly described in the September 9th Radio Derb.

Highlights: A day spent at the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens and then, on Labor Day itself, the Cabbage Island Clambake. In between, kayaking in Linekin Bay and some exploring.

That Labor Day clambake—the last of the season—was my first clambake ever, and proved to be all it was advertised to be. If there are clambakes elsewhere I’m definitely up for them, but I’ll be surprised if they’re as good as Cabbage Island’s.

As regular readers and listeners know, I take a daily New York Post to read over my breakfast oatmeal. It so happened that a few days before we set off for Maine, when we were in the final stages of planning the logistics of the trip, New York Post gossip columnist Cindy Adams posted a report of a trip to Maine that she had just made. Her report was… not uniformly positive.

No litter. No trash. It’s polite. Friendly. Inexpensive. Seafood. Lobsters the size of Radio City. Locals whose behinds overlap the state of Texas all stuffed into shorts. Realtors could establish an entire campsite on the average ass.

In Kennebunkport, Bar Harbor, Portland, Ogunquit, Freeport, Eastport the concept of dressing is only for salad. Forget shopping. Skirts, necklaces, socks, ties, footwear, knife-pressed longpants went out with the first settlers. L.L. Bean jeans, drawers, plaid shirts, crappy sweaters, sweats, sneakers and backpacks are considered black tie.

You have to cut Cindy Adams some slack. She is the quintessential New Yorker, in fact Manhattanite, with an outlook on the rest of the world—including the rest of the U.S.A.—corresponding closely to Saul Steinberg’s famous 1976 New Yorker cover. She closed her column with:

Mainers, maybe ecstatic just to see anyone, are friendly. Anything you want, except for trees, you have to get in your car to get.

I climbed into mine to get back to civilization and New York.

That was a tad too much even for the good-natured citizens of Maine. One of them showed up in the Post’s Letters columns a few days later:

Mainers are fit, fun, relaxed and unpretentious—hence the lack of ties.

Guess I won’t be seeing you in Maine any time soon. But it’s sad that you consider New York civilization, especially of late.

That last sentence would be a direct hit if not for the fact that New York’s style of barbarism is at least mostly native-born, while Maine’s has been imported from Somalia.

[Permalink]


Falls Rome, falls the world    My earliest acquaintance with dyed-in-the-wool Manhattanites was literary. Around age thirteen or fourteen, my teenage passion for science fiction well under way, I read George R. Stewart’s 1949 novel Earth Abides.

For those who don’t know their sci-fi classics, Earth Abides is a post-catastrophe story. A plague has quite suddenly wiped out most of humanity, leaving only scattered survivors here and there. We follow the fortunes of one such: Isherwood Williams, who we get to know as Ish, a graduate student at a West Coast university when the plague struck (George R. Stewart taught English at Berkeley).

Ish takes a cross-country trip seeking other survivors. He finds a couple in New York City: Milt, ”middle-aged and overweight,” and Ann, ”a blonde-haired woman, about forty, well dressed, almost smart-looking.” More or less alone in the empty city, they have helped themselves to an apartment uptown on Riverside Drive where they fill their days playing cribbage and two-handed rummy, drinking martinis, playing records on the phonograph, and reading mystery stories. ”Physically, he guessed, they found each other attractive.” I guess so.

Ish spends an evening with them.

They played cards by candlelight—three-handed bridge … It was a kind of make-believe.

Yet, as the cards were dealt and played, by incidental remarks here and there, Ish put together a great deal of the situation. Milt had been part-owner of a small jewelry store. Ann had been the wife of someone named Harry, and they had been prosperous enough to spend summers on the coast of Maine.

Coast of Maine? Hey…

Now the two of them occupied a fine apartment, vastly better than even Harry had been able to provide. The electricity had failed immediately, because the dynamos which supplied New York had been steam-driven … Being ordinary New Yorkers they had never owned a car, and so neither of them could drive …

Ish figures that Milt and Ann are doomed. The catastrophe had struck early in the year; winter, with no central heating, will probably kill them off.

They were like the highly bred spaniels and pekinese who at the end of their leashes had once walked along the city streets. Milt and Ann, too, were city-dwellers, and when the city died, they would hardly survive without it.

I doubt Cindy Adams is much troubled by thoughts of catastrophe, epidemic or otherwise;

ARTICLES

By John Derbyshire on 09/30/2022

The lady representing the ”Spirit of Liberty” above is from Eugene Delacroix’s famous picture of France’s July Revolution of 1830, not the much worse 1789 French Revolution. A similarly attired lady can be seen on the State Seal of Virginia.

[Adapted from the latest Radio Derb, now available exclusively on VDARE.com]

Michael Anton is a former Trump Deputy National Security Advisor and an occasional acquaintance of mine. He it was that wrote the famous ”Flight 93 Election” essay in the Claremont Review of Books before the 2016 election, urging readers to vote for Donald Trump. Given the prominence that article attained right before the election, and the narrowness of the vote margins, it is entirely possible that Michael gave us the Trump Presidency.

Michael just fired off another broadside ”What Does Fidelity to Our Founding Principles Require Today?” [American Greatness, September 26, 2022].

This essay is in the grand tradition of mocking Establishment conservatives like Britain’s Tories and our own GOP for their meekness and ineffectuality in the face of leftist advances.

But Michael also builds up a case for a thoughtful, carefully qualified Right Of Revolution—which is actually   specified in the famous second paragraph of the Declaration Of Independence. He says:

I maintain it as axiomatic that you can’t have Natural Rights without a Right Of Revolution, just as you can’t have the Founding without an actual revolution, and since you can’t have the regime of the Founders without Natural Rights, you can’t have the Founding principles or the Founders’ regime without a Right Of Revolution. Each piece is integral to the machine. Remove one, and the whole thing collapses in self-contradiction.

Read the piece for yourself—please: It’s an important contribution to our national conversation.

The final paragraph left me smiling. Here Michael is speaking about Establishment conservatives:

To be fair, the conservatives can muster strength when they see a real threat to their position. You can be sure that, if you so much as glance in the direction of wondering if the Right of Revolution exists—even in theory—there a conservative will be, armed and ready…to shoot you in the back.

On that theme: if you had been in my kitchen Tuesday

By Rémi Tremblay on 09/29/2022

See also: The “Great Replacement” Comes For The QUEBECOIS DE SOUCHE (And Anglos Too)

Chances are Quebec’s incumbent Premier François Legault, of the Coalition Avenir Québec, will enjoy an easy win in the provincial (= U.S. state) election on Monday, October 3. He got VDARE.com’s attention back in 2018 when he won an unexpected victory with the help of a Trump-style dramatic immigration patriot feint. But, also like Trump, his performance in office has been disappointing. It has become clear that Legault is basically a civic (albeit French-speaking Quebec) nationalist who keeps the Identity card, the defense of the French language, and our collective survival, up his sleeve to play when necessary. As a French-speaking Québécois, I think this isn’t good enough and I will vote for the explicitly separatist Parti Québécois, which has recently abandoned its flirtation with leftist Wokeism and is now—too late!—better on immigration than the CAQ [Parti Québécois would reduce immigration to Quebec if elected, by  Frédéric Lacroix-Couture, Montreal Gazette, September 5, 2022]. But still, as English Canada’s flagship Toronto Globe and Mail just put it, “Quebec is the one [Canadian] province where immigration is a ballot-box issue in provincial elections”[Parties promise to limit immigration in Quebec election, by  Konrad Yakabuski, September 30, 2022]. So much the worse for English Canada!

Since spring, Legault has been surfing on a popularity wave ranging from 40 to 50 percent, the remainder of the vote being split between four parties [A debate and week later, polls show little change in CAQ appeal, by Daniel J. Rowe, CTV News, September 21, 2022]. Except for some Anglo or multiethnic ridings (= U.S. House Districts), nowhere in Quebec is unwinnable for Legault and his CAQ.

In effect, both personally and politically, Legault seems to have reincarnated the hegemonic National (Quebec) Conservative, implicitly crypto-separatist, Union National party of Maurice Duplessis, premier of Quebec 1944-1959. This may be a sweet spot: the French-speaking Québécois are, in fact,  cautious non-Leftists. In this election campaign, all Legault had to do was sit, wait, and avoid any faux pas. That’s what he did.

But again, that won’t help identitarians and nationalists who see their homeland slipping away.

In May, nationalists were enthused by

By Patrick J. Buchanan on 09/29/2022

Asked, "What is an American?" many would answer, "An American is a citizen of the United States."

Yet, at the First Continental Congress in 1774, 15 years before the U.S. became a nation of 13 states, Patrick Henry rose to proclaim that, "British oppression has effaced the boundaries of the several colonies; the distinctions between Virginians, Pennsylvanians, New Yorkers, and New Englanders are no more. I am not a Virginian, but an American."

Henry was saying—more than a dozen years before our constitutional republic was established—that America already existed as a nation, and he was her loyal son.

In an 1815 letter to Thomas Jefferson, long after both men had served as president, John Adams wrote:

"As to the history of the Revolution, my Ideas may be peculiar, perhaps Singular. What do We mean by the Revolution? The War? That was no part of the Revolution. It was only an Effect and Consequence of it. The Revolution was in the Minds of the People, and this was effected, from 1760 to 1775, in the course of fifteen Years before a drop of blood was drawn at Lexington."

Adams was saying that America was conceived and, as an embryonic nation, grew within the hearts of the peoples of the 13 colonies, two to three decades before the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.

In short, our country came to be before our republic came to be, and long before what we today call "our democracy" came to be. A country is different from, and more than, the political system that it adopts.

France was France

By Ann Coulter on 09/28/2022

Earlier: ANN COULTER: Rich Martha’s Vineyard Liberals Have Shown Us The Way On Illegal Aliens

The massive news coverage of Gov. Ron DeSantis’ “political stunt” of sending 50 illegal aliens to Martha’s Vineyard reminds me of the media’s “political stunt” of referring to illegals as “legal asylum-seekers.”

Number one: They broke into our country. They’re illegal aliens. Number two: All asylum claims are frauds. Every single one.

Asylum is nothing but a conveyer belt to bring the worst people on Earth to our shores. You say you turned your own country into a hellhole? Fantastic! Come right in!

No one gets asylum from a well-run country. Why would we want to admit people who have demonstrated the wisdom, foresight and diligence to produce a functioning society? Rewards await only those who’ve participated in the creation of complete disaster zones. (Just think of what these great thinkers could do for our country!)

Take the Venezuelan illegal aliens whom DeSantis sent to Martha’s Vineyard. Biden’s press secretary and human kewpie doll, Karine Jean-Pierre, repeatedly referred to the briefly loved illegals as “people who are fleeing communism, who are fleeing hardship... desperate people—people who are trying to come here because they’re fleeing communism themselves.”

How did Venezuela become communist again?

As the Martha’s Vineyard Times explained (once the illegals were safely expelled and the island fumigated), Venezuela’s “humanitarian crisis” resulted from that country’s “complicated political and socioeconomic history.”

Actually, it’s not that complicated. Poor people in Venezuela voted for it. Oh boy, did they vote for it.

The ridiculous peasant Hugo Chavez promised Venezuela’s poor that he would take vengeance on

By Peter Brimelow on 09/27/2022

[Research by Edwin S. Rubenstein]

August’s job report was as usual vigorously spun by the Regime Media and the Biden White House [US hiring slows but remains strong, as economy adds 315,000 jobs, by Max Zahn, ABC News, September 2, 2022]. But data released since then—illegal border crossings, inflation, Federal Reserve interest rate hike—has been a series of hammer blows. Basically, American workers are earning less and facing recession. And, as usual unreported by anyone except VDARE.com, the fact is that those vigorously spun job numbers also contain the news that immigrants are continuing to edge out American workers.

Et tu, Breitbart? Even the generally excellent Breitbart Business Digest echoed the Regime Media’s endless flow of Democrat talking points after the September 2 release of August’s jobs data: “The morning after President Joe Biden delivered his Dark Brandon at the Gates of Hell speech, the Labor Department delivered a jobs report that was pretty close to perfect” [Breitbart Business Digest Dark Brandon vs. the Labor Market, by John Carney, September 2022].

That was because the Payroll Survey suggested a hiring slowdown, supposedly a sign that inflation is cooling. But the parallel Household Survey, regularly ignored by pundits for reason we don’t understand, showed hiring still surging. And more important from VDARE.com’s perspective: the Household Survey showed continued immigrant displacement of American workers

Employers added 315,000 people to their payrolls last month, down sharply from the 526,000 they hired in July. But the Household Employment Survey reported employment rose by 442,000 in August, more than doubling its anemic 179,000 gain in July.

Household Survey figures are invariably above Payroll Survey

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