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By Peter Brimelow on 2019-03-21 22:06:00 -0400

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James Fulford writes: The Mueller Report, which was supposed to be about alleged “Russian collusion” with Trump, is due out, and many people in the Democrat/Media conglomerate are hoping for a rerun of Watergate, which they think of as a victory for the Rule of Law. It wasn’t, and we need to have one of those famous “conversationsabout what it was, and why it mustn’t happen again.

In 1972, Richard Nixon was reelected with 520 electoral votes. He was running on winning the Vietnam War and also fighting a War on Crime. His opponent, George McGovern (17 electoral votes) was running on a plan to lose the Vietnam War, and surrender on the War on Crime.

But by August 1974, Nixon was removed from office, and in April 1975, Vietnamese Communist troops occupied Saigon. What finished off South Vietnam was the “Watergate Congress” which voted to cut off all supplies. For details see James Webb's  Peace? Defeat? What Did the Vietnam War Protesters Want?American Enterprise Institute, May/June 1997.

Who did this? Well, the Democrat-controlled Senate investigated the hell out of a break-and-enter committed by Republicans, which they never did when LBJ, JFK, Truman, and FDR engaged in similar activities. See It Didn’t Start With Watergate, [PDF]by Victor Lasky, published in 1977. On the Senate investigative staff was a young, far-Left Wellesley graduate named Hillary Clinton.

The Democratic media, which hated Nixon with the same kind of hate they now display towards Trump, did the same thing, led by the famous Woodward and Bernstein, who probably get too much “credit” for this.

Finally, in something that VDARE.com Editor Peter Brimelow speculated about in his 1981 Policy Review article reposted below, the secret figure of “Deep Throat” (Woodward and Bernstein’s name for an source inside the Government) turned out to Mark Felt, second in command of the FBI. [The Myth of Deep Throat | Mark Felt wasn’t out to protect American democracy and the rule of law; he was out to get a promotion, by Max Holland September 10, 2017]

Peter Brimelow described this phenomenon of using lawfare to overturn elections by trying to criminalize the victors in his post Manafort, Marlborough, And Robert E. Lee: Criminalizing Policy/ Personnel, Differences— U.S. Politics Regressing To The Primitive.

Once again, the Establishment is trying, as they did during Watergate, to overturn the results of an election with the aid of a Deep State, and the “foreign policy” establishment. “Deep Throat” Felt thought Nixon was interfering with the “independence” of the FBI, which he thought should be immune to interference by the President of the United States, and apparently James Comey feels the same way.

If this coup succeeds, instead of the Republic of South Vietnam being overrun by foreign invaders and destroyed, the victim will be the Historic American Nation.

Machiavelli Redux, By Peter Brimelow, Policy Review, Winter 1981

GO QUIETLY . . . OR ELSE. By Spiro T. Agnew. (Wm. Morrow, New York, 1980)

THE TERRORS OF JUSTICE. By Maurice Stans. (New York, Everest House, 1978)

WILL: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF G. GORDON LIDDY. By G. Gordon Liddy. (St. Martins Press, New York, 1980)

Machiavelli concluded The Prince by quoting Petrarch in an attempt to inspire the rulers of Italy:

For th’ old Romane valour is not dead

Nor in th’ Italians brests extinguished.

Reading these three books by survivors of the Nixon disaster brings home how totally that Administration, which more than any other in recent history would have welcomed comparisons with Machiavelli, departed from his prescription. The reason was not exactly lack of patriotism, but rather a failure to understand the humane, even idealistic spark that animated Machiavelli’s ironic realism. Indeed, the books raise the broader question of whether American society itself is going through the kind of degeneration Machiavelli decried in Italy, so that it no longer supports what might loosely be called the “Roman” or “military” virtues: courage, loyalty, and personal integrity.

These reflections may seem odd, given that all three authors fought losing bouts with the law. Spiro Agnew resigned the Vice-Presidency and entered a plea of nolo contendere to a charge that he received payments in 1967 which were not expended for political purposes and which were therefore subject to income tax. The prosecution’s statement included forty pages about Mr. Agnew’s alleged bribe-taking while he was Governor of Maryland; Mr. Agnew issued a one-page denial. The judge said, accurately, that both were irrelevant to the case before him, and fined Mr. Agnew $10,000. Maurice Stans, Nixon’s 1972 Finance Chairman, pleaded guilty to two charges of unknowingly accepting illegal contributions and three charges of reporting contributions tardily. He was fined $5,000. Previously Mr. Stans had been found innocent, along with John Mitchell, on ten counts of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and perjury relating to an alleged attempt by financier Robert Vesco to buy protection from the Securities and Exchange Commission. Gordon Liddy was sentenced to twenty years in prison and fined $40,000 for the Watergate burglary, a year and a half for refusing to talk to the Watergate grand jury, and a (suspended) year for contempt of Congress.

By Patrick J. Buchanan on 2019-03-21 18:39:00 -0400

Joestacey

Of 895 slots in the freshman class of Stuyvesant High in New York City, seven were offered this year to black students, down from 10 last year and 13 the year before.

In the freshman class of 803 at The Bronx High School of Science, 12 students are black, down from last year's 25.

Of 303 students admitted to Staten Island Technical High School, one is African-American.

According to The New York Times, similar patterns of admission apply at the other five most elite high schools in the city.

Whites and Asians are 30 percent of middle school students, but 83 percent of the freshman at Bronx High School of Science, 88 percent at Staten Island Technical and 90 percent at Stuyvesant.

What do these numbers tell us?

They reveal the racial composition of the cohort of scientists and technicians who will lead America in the 21st century. And they tell us which races will not be well represented in that vanguard.

They identify a fault line that runs through the Democratic Party, separating leftists who believe in equality of results for all races and ethnic groups, and those who believe in a meritocracy.

By VDARE.com Reader on 2019-03-21 11:23:00 -0400
Re: John Derbyshire's One cheer for Ilhan Omar,  on Dual Citizenship From: A Canadian Reader [Email him] I agree with Derbyshire that dual citizenship should not be allowed as a rule. However, I think that this should apply only to adults, and adults should also be allowed to have dual citizenship transitionally. Minors who have dual, or multiple citizenship, should make an option before the age of...
By Steve Sailer on 2019-03-21 00:54:00 -0400
A journalistic perennial is to dig up some arcane field that requires high skills but doesn’t pay particularly well and complain about underrepresentation of blacks. For example, Amy Harmon recently complained that less than one percent of the tenured math professors at research universities are black. She focused on the example of one black male professor who was moving from Purdue U. to Pomona Co...
By Steve Sailer on 2019-03-21 00:46:00 -0400
From the New York Times: A Museum Tackles Myths About Jews and Money These aren’t even tropes, they are myths. Myths, I tell you! “Judas Returning the Thirty Pieces of Silver” (1629), by Rembrandt, is the centerpiece of an exhibition called “Jews, Money, Myth” at the Jewish Museum in London. After all, what better proves that stereotypes about Jews and money are myths than a Jewish Museum lav...
By Steve Sailer on 2019-03-21 00:40:00 -0400
From Australian Broadcasting: Italian bus driver tries to burn dozens of schoolchildren aliveUpdated 8 minutes ago Italian police have ended a dramatic ordeal for 51 students and their teachers who were tied up and held captive by their bus driver who threatened to torch everyone inside the vehicle. Police broke glass windows in the back of the bus and got all the passengers to safety without ser...
By Federale on 2019-03-21 00:16:00 -0400
The Portland School District, following the lead of the Sanctuary City of Portland, and its lawless judges, has decided to require its employees to aid illegal aliens when U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) comes calling. (h/t reader Sonny G.) Prior to this development, Portland was a sanctuary city, then it went a step further when it decided that the police will not respond to attacks...
By Allan Wall on 2019-03-20 22:39:00 -0400

Nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars, Roma has generated controversy in Mexico. Written and directed by Euro-Mexican filmmaker Alfonso Cuaron (right) it tells the story of a Euro-Mexican family (pictured above )and their live-in Indian maids in Mexico City’s Roma neighborhood. Understandably, its success has caused no small measure of joy and pride. But it has also triggered difficult “conversation about race”—not supposed to be an issue in Mexico. Eric Holder, call your office!

Roma received 10 Oscar nominations: Cuaron for Best Picture and Best Director, Yalitza Aparicio for actress and Marina de Tavira for supporting actress. It won Best Foreign Language Film, with Cuaron picking up Best Director and Best Cinematography. He shot the film himself.

Yalitza Aparicio (31374009897).jpgSignificantly, Aparicio, a 25-year old “indigenous” A.K.A.  Indian woman from Oaxaca, portrayed the protagonist. The half-Mixtec-half-Triqui, actress (left) studied to be a teacher. Roma is her maiden role and made her a star.

Again and again, we are told, Americans are inveterate racists who should be more like Mexicans and other Latin Americans, who not only don’t care about race, but also are more open to and accepting of those of a different hue and background.

That’s bunk, of course. Race is supremely important in Mexico, as the hullabaloo over Roma has made clear.

By Ann Coulter on 2019-03-20 17:09:00 -0400

Poor Felicity Huffman is being raked over the coals for paying a lousy $15,000 to get her daughter extra time to take the SAT.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91odoy-pTkL.jpgJared Kushner's father paid $2.5 million to get him into Harvard—and arranged for two of his beneficiary politicians, Sens. Ted Kennedy and Frank Lautenberg, to make calls on his offspring's behalf.

"His GPA did not warrant it, his SAT scores did not warrant it," a former administrator at Jared's private high school told Daniel Golden, author of the 2006 book, The Price of Admission. There was no way anybody in the administrative office of the school thought he would on the merits get into Harvard."

Welcome to the baby boom's remaking of college admissions!

For decades, going to college was a matter of social class, not IQ, talent or merit. From 1900 to 1960, only a tiny percentage of Americans even went to college, about 2 to 5 percent until well after World War II.

It wasn't until the '60s that admission to college first began to be based on a universal standardized test, the Scholastic Aptitude Test. This fulfilled the dream of Harvard president James Conant, who believed that SAT-based admissions would redeem America's promise of a classless society.

Recall that England's law of primogeniture was one of the best things that ever happened to this country. If you are a small island nation and want to keep land from being chopped up every generation, it makes sense to mandate that entire estates be bequeathed to the first-born son. But that left a lot of smart second-, third- and fourth-born sons—not to mention daughters—out in the cold.The talented, but screwed, Brits responded by hopping on boats, sailing across the ocean and creating America! In this country, status would be earned, not inherited.

By Washington Watcher on 2019-03-20 13:24:00 -0400
A prominent Republican has decided to take on Twitter in court, but it’s not cause for celebration for immigration patriots. California Rep. Devin Nunes filed a lawsuit against Twitter and three users Monday. The congressman claims Twitter allowed a defamation campaign to be waged against, as well as shadow-banned his personal Twitter account. Conservative tweeters rejoiced over the lawsuit, seeing...
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By Peter Brimelow on 2019-03-21 22:06:00 -0400

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James Fulford writes: The Mueller Report, which was supposed to be about alleged “Russian collusion” with Trump, is due out, and many people in the Democrat/Media conglomerate are hoping for a rerun of Watergate, which they think of as a victory for the Rule of Law. It wasn’t, and we need to have one of those famous “conversationsabout what it was, and why it mustn’t happen again.

In 1972, Richard Nixon was reelected with 520 electoral votes. He was running on winning the Vietnam War and also fighting a War on Crime. His opponent, George McGovern (17 electoral votes) was running on a plan to lose the Vietnam War, and surrender on the War on Crime.

But by August 1974, Nixon was removed from office, and in April 1975, Vietnamese Communist troops occupied Saigon. What finished off South Vietnam was the “Watergate Congress” which voted to cut off all supplies. For details see James Webb's  Peace? Defeat? What Did the Vietnam War Protesters Want?American Enterprise Institute, May/June 1997.

Who did this? Well, the Democrat-controlled Senate investigated the hell out of a break-and-enter committed by Republicans, which they never did when LBJ, JFK, Truman, and FDR engaged in similar activities. See It Didn’t Start With Watergate, [PDF]by Victor Lasky, published in 1977. On the Senate investigative staff was a young, far-Left Wellesley graduate named Hillary Clinton.

The Democratic media, which hated Nixon with the same kind of hate they now display towards Trump, did the same thing, led by the famous Woodward and Bernstein, who probably get too much “credit” for this.

Finally, in something that VDARE.com Editor Peter Brimelow speculated about in his 1981 Policy Review article reposted below, the secret figure of “Deep Throat” (Woodward and Bernstein’s name for an source inside the Government) turned out to Mark Felt, second in command of the FBI. [The Myth of Deep Throat | Mark Felt wasn’t out to protect American democracy and the rule of law; he was out to get a promotion, by Max Holland September 10, 2017]

Peter Brimelow described this phenomenon of using lawfare to overturn elections by trying to criminalize the victors in his post Manafort, Marlborough, And Robert E. Lee: Criminalizing Policy/ Personnel, Differences— U.S. Politics Regressing To The Primitive.

Once again, the Establishment is trying, as they did during Watergate, to overturn the results of an election with the aid of a Deep State, and the “foreign policy” establishment. “Deep Throat” Felt thought Nixon was interfering with the “independence” of the FBI, which he thought should be immune to interference by the President of the United States, and apparently James Comey feels the same way.

If this coup succeeds, instead of the Republic of South Vietnam being overrun by foreign invaders and destroyed, the victim will be the Historic American Nation.

Machiavelli Redux, By Peter Brimelow, Policy Review, Winter 1981

GO QUIETLY . . . OR ELSE. By Spiro T. Agnew. (Wm. Morrow, New York, 1980)

THE TERRORS OF JUSTICE. By Maurice Stans. (New York, Everest House, 1978)

WILL: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF G. GORDON LIDDY. By G. Gordon Liddy. (St. Martins Press, New York, 1980)

Machiavelli concluded The Prince by quoting Petrarch in an attempt to inspire the rulers of Italy:

For th’ old Romane valour is not dead

Nor in th’ Italians brests extinguished.

Reading these three books by survivors of the Nixon disaster brings home how totally that Administration, which more than any other in recent history would have welcomed comparisons with Machiavelli, departed from his prescription. The reason was not exactly lack of patriotism, but rather a failure to understand the humane, even idealistic spark that animated Machiavelli’s ironic realism. Indeed, the books raise the broader question of whether American society itself is going through the kind of degeneration Machiavelli decried in Italy, so that it no longer supports what might loosely be called the “Roman” or “military” virtues: courage, loyalty, and personal integrity.

These reflections may seem odd, given that all three authors fought losing bouts with the law. Spiro Agnew resigned the Vice-Presidency and entered a plea of nolo contendere to a charge that he received payments in 1967 which were not expended for political purposes and which were therefore subject to income tax. The prosecution’s statement included forty pages about Mr. Agnew’s alleged bribe-taking while he was Governor of Maryland; Mr. Agnew issued a one-page denial. The judge said, accurately, that both were irrelevant to the case before him, and fined Mr. Agnew $10,000. Maurice Stans, Nixon’s 1972 Finance Chairman, pleaded guilty to two charges of unknowingly accepting illegal contributions and three charges of reporting contributions tardily. He was fined $5,000. Previously Mr. Stans had been found innocent, along with John Mitchell, on ten counts of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and perjury relating to an alleged attempt by financier Robert Vesco to buy protection from the Securities and Exchange Commission. Gordon Liddy was sentenced to twenty years in prison and fined $40,000 for the Watergate burglary, a year and a half for refusing to talk to the Watergate grand jury, and a (suspended) year for contempt of Congress.

By Patrick J. Buchanan on 2019-03-21 18:39:00 -0400

Joestacey

Of 895 slots in the freshman class of Stuyvesant High in New York City, seven were offered this year to black students, down from 10 last year and 13 the year before.

In the freshman class of 803 at The Bronx High School of Science, 12 students are black, down from last year's 25.

Of 303 students admitted to Staten Island Technical High School, one is African-American.

According to The New York Times, similar patterns of admission apply at the other five most elite high schools in the city.

Whites and Asians are 30 percent of middle school students, but 83 percent of the freshman at Bronx High School of Science, 88 percent at Staten Island Technical and 90 percent at Stuyvesant.

What do these numbers tell us?

They reveal the racial composition of the cohort of scientists and technicians who will lead America in the 21st century. And they tell us which races will not be well represented in that vanguard.

They identify a fault line that runs through the Democratic Party, separating leftists who believe in equality of results for all races and ethnic groups, and those who believe in a meritocracy.

By Allan Wall on 2019-03-20 22:39:00 -0400

Nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars, Roma has generated controversy in Mexico. Written and directed by Euro-Mexican filmmaker Alfonso Cuaron (right) it tells the story of a Euro-Mexican family (pictured above )and their live-in Indian maids in Mexico City’s Roma neighborhood. Understandably, its success has caused no small measure of joy and pride. But it has also triggered difficult “conversation about race”—not supposed to be an issue in Mexico. Eric Holder, call your office!

Roma received 10 Oscar nominations: Cuaron for Best Picture and Best Director, Yalitza Aparicio for actress and Marina de Tavira for supporting actress. It won Best Foreign Language Film, with Cuaron picking up Best Director and Best Cinematography. He shot the film himself.

Yalitza Aparicio (31374009897).jpgSignificantly, Aparicio, a 25-year old “indigenous” A.K.A.  Indian woman from Oaxaca, portrayed the protagonist. The half-Mixtec-half-Triqui, actress (left) studied to be a teacher. Roma is her maiden role and made her a star.

Again and again, we are told, Americans are inveterate racists who should be more like Mexicans and other Latin Americans, who not only don’t care about race, but also are more open to and accepting of those of a different hue and background.

That’s bunk, of course. Race is supremely important in Mexico, as the hullabaloo over Roma has made clear.

By Ann Coulter on 2019-03-20 17:09:00 -0400

Poor Felicity Huffman is being raked over the coals for paying a lousy $15,000 to get her daughter extra time to take the SAT.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91odoy-pTkL.jpgJared Kushner's father paid $2.5 million to get him into Harvard—and arranged for two of his beneficiary politicians, Sens. Ted Kennedy and Frank Lautenberg, to make calls on his offspring's behalf.

"His GPA did not warrant it, his SAT scores did not warrant it," a former administrator at Jared's private high school told Daniel Golden, author of the 2006 book, The Price of Admission. There was no way anybody in the administrative office of the school thought he would on the merits get into Harvard."

Welcome to the baby boom's remaking of college admissions!

For decades, going to college was a matter of social class, not IQ, talent or merit. From 1900 to 1960, only a tiny percentage of Americans even went to college, about 2 to 5 percent until well after World War II.

It wasn't until the '60s that admission to college first began to be based on a universal standardized test, the Scholastic Aptitude Test. This fulfilled the dream of Harvard president James Conant, who believed that SAT-based admissions would redeem America's promise of a classless society.

Recall that England's law of primogeniture was one of the best things that ever happened to this country. If you are a small island nation and want to keep land from being chopped up every generation, it makes sense to mandate that entire estates be bequeathed to the first-born son. But that left a lot of smart second-, third- and fourth-born sons—not to mention daughters—out in the cold.The talented, but screwed, Brits responded by hopping on boats, sailing across the ocean and creating America! In this country, status would be earned, not inherited.

By Michelle Malkin on 2019-03-19 21:45:00 -0400
See, earlier, by Michelle Malkin: Never Forget—Muslim Hate Crime Hoaxes The Council on American-Islamic Relations is having a banner month. The militant Muslim group never lets a crisis go to waste. That means Americans should beware. When unappeasable CAIR is ascendant, our free speech rights, religious liberty and national security are at risk. Following the horrible massacre at two mosques in Ch...
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