Raza Racists Angered at Arizona's Ethnic Studies Prohibitions

The Mexican fifth column located in Arizona is unhappy that restraints have been placed on one of its major propaganda arms, namely the Raza-friendly ethnic studies that have afflicted the Tucson schools. (Raza means “The Race.”)

The new state law has followed closely behind the immigration law that has been so slandered by the dinosaur liberal media, open-borders Mexicans are doubly angered. The limits put on social studies in schools are pretty basic: no sedition taught, no division of students by ethnic group to be taught a specific flavor of victimhood. But the law clamps down on what chicanos in Che berets want to teach: takeover of the American southwest with communist hispanic control.

Arizona bill takes aim at ethnic studies classes, Los Angeles Times, May 10, 2010

At the main entrance to a campus in Tucson, a sign greets visitors with “Welcome to Tucson High, Home of the Largest Xicano Studies Program in the Nation.”

“Xicano,” or Chicano, studies is a 14-year-old program in the Tucson Unified School District that offers classes from elementary through high school in topics such as literature, history and social justice that emphasize Latino authors and history.

In the wake of Arizona’s adoption of a law to crack down on illegal immigration, such classes are the subject of another ethnically tinged fight in the state. Another bill approved by the Legislature seeks to ban such courses, which critics say promote “ethnic chauvinism.”

Supporters of Mexican American studies say the aim is to offer subjects and perspectives ignored by academia, as well as foster pride in a marginalized community.

In teacher Curtis Acosta’s literature class at Tucson High, the walls are plastered with the faces of labor leaders Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta and Latin American revolutionary Che Guevara. Students read fiction by Luis Alberto Urrea and Junot Diaz and plays by the Los Angeles-based theater troupe Culture Clash. A poster proclaims “United Together En La Lucha”—In The Struggle.

The proposed law would ban schools from teaching classes that promote the overthrow of the U.S. government, are designed for students of a particular ethnic group, promote resentment or advocate ethnic solidarity over treating pupils as individuals.

The “Xicano” syllabus doesn’t present much of America’s founders apparently.

As a result of being thwarted, the junior revolutionaries put on their Raza outfits (including berets and masks) and displayed their displeasure at Tucson High. (This bunch will take any excuse to walk out of class and cause trouble. Hispanics’ disinterest in education is deeply engrained and shows up in consistently high dropout rates.)

The State Superintendent of Schools, Tom Horne, appeared on NPR to explain his position in more detail, probably trying to head off the MSM going bonkers with lies again:

New AZ Law Targets �Ethnic Studies’ Programs, National Public Radio, May 13, 2010

KEYES: Superintendent Horne, is it wrong to highlight the contributions of specific ethnicities that you might not have heard about before? I mean, when I was growing up in Chicago, they didn’t focus a whole lot about the history and culture of people of color. I realize that has changed in many ways, but is that not something important that kids need to know?

Mr. HORNE: Absolutely. And the standards that my department promulgates, we require in the social studies classes that the students learn about contributions of all different cultures. We think that’s very important. But what we’re against is ghettoizing students. Raza studies for the Mexican kids. African-American studies for the African-American kids. Asian studies for the Asian kids. Indian studies for the Native-American kids – and then just teach them about the contributions of the group that they happen to have been born into.

We think kids should be taught together. They should be taught to treat each other as individuals, that what race they happened to have been born into is irrelevant. What’s relevant is what you know, what you can do, what’s your character, not what race you happened to have been born into. And we teach the contributions of different groups together in a social studies class for all kids.

The job of the public schools is to bring kids from different backgrounds together and teach them to treat each other as individuals. I’ll read to you a brief sentence from a third teacher. She’s overheard the Raza studies teacher tell students that they need to go to college so they can gain the power to take back the stolen land and give it back to Mexico. He personally told me that he teaches his students that Republicans hate Latinos, and he has the legislation to prove it. When he asked him about Mexican-American Republicans who are against illegal immigration, he said this is an example of self-racism.

Naturally, reason and American sovereignty have no appeal to the hard-core Mexican fifth column. Several students were arrested last week for trespassing after a news conference held by Tom Horne:

More than a dozen TUSD students arrested protesting ethnic studies law, KVOA TV, May 12, 2010

[The students] gathered at the state education office on Stone, while upstairs behind closed doors, Horne spoke to the press. Horne says classes designed for students of a particular ethnic group promotes a climate of fear and a dysfunction education. He and deputy superintendent Margaret Dugan showed a picture recently published in the Los Angeles Times of TUSD students at a rally, before the bill was signed into law Tuesday. [NOTE: the photo shown above.)

“The class itself is just one piece. But when you have students wearing brown shirts, bandanas, and sunglasses, this is serious. We are teaching kids to hate the very country they are living in,” says Dugan.

It’s pretty crazy to to allow teaching kids that they should revolt against this country and be doing it on the citizen taxpayer’s dime in the public schools. Good for Arizona for turning off that particular spigot of cultural insanity.